Will my hybrid stand up to touring?

Banjo

Fuelled with Jelly Babies
Location
South Wales
I would like to do some overnight touring next year maybe building up to a full week.

I bought my Trek Valencia this year ,its a great bike on the road and I have ridden it with panniers heavy with shopping without problem.

I know a proper tourer would be better but it seems hard to justify another bike just for such limited use.Also storage space could be an issue with a shed crammed full of the families bikes allready ;)

I would travel as light as possible and stay on roads ,as I am 3.5 stone lighter now than when I started my reasoning is that I could carry the difference in weight as luggage?
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Billloudon

New Member
Location
Escocia
I don't know the Trek too well but in general, no problems.
I have toured France several times with my Giant well laden and every time was a joy. No off roading tho'.
Go for it!
 

Tim Bennet.

Entirely Average Member
Location
S of Kendal
It will be absolutely find.

If you find the 'tail starts to wag the dog' when loaded, then consider either front panniers or taking less stuff.
 

jay clock

Massive member
Location
Hampshire UK
It looks perfect. If you get into touring you may well want something different but for a few nights lightly laden you will be ok. The only possible weak points are heel clearance (heels hitting panniers) but the bike has 700c tyres instead of MTB wheels, which adds a bit of space, and since you already have had panniers on, it seems ok.

I would put bar ends on to add extra riding positions (on my flat barred tourer I use these pretty much exclusively). Mudguards would be a good move too.

If not already done so, I would have a look at www.crazyguyonabike.com - the best around for touring advice. My own offerings are at www.crazyguyonabike.com/julian

Happy touring!
 
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Banjo

Banjo

Fuelled with Jelly Babies
Location
South Wales
Thanks for such quick replies.

Re the pannier clearance jay clock.I have had to move them as far back as possible to give heel clearance. I may be able to move them forward a tiny bit to get the weight more forward but not mucjh. I will be getting a bar bag for waterproofs maps food etc so that will balance it slightly.

I have several months now to plan my first 2 day tour on bikehike . I cant wait for spring now :-)

Standby for a winters worth of silly questions :-) I apologise in advance.
 

Alan Whicker

Senior Member
Go for it! People have toured on all sorts of things over the years.

A mate and me toured the Lake District a few years ago on lardy, low-end steel MTBs. He was on a Saracen Rufftrax, and I was on a Claud Butler Xanthos (which was very comfy). We had knobbly tyres and hired panniers. No problems other than the rolling-resistance of the tyres which didn't really bother us, and we had a great time. Your bike looks perfect by comparison!

+1 on the advice about bar ends. I couldn't live without them.
 

jay clock

Massive member
Location
Hampshire UK
Great. It terms of bar bag they are often big (too big!). I have one of these which is only 3 litres but ample for wallet, phone, keys, camera and possibly a featherweight jacket. http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/ebw...6&f_SortOrderID=1&f_bct=c003154c003119c003125

Also, do think REALLY long and hard about what stuff you need to carry. I managed with two big panniers and a dry bag on the rack for tent and airbed on my last tour. You should not need to fill those panniers!
 

palinurus

Velo, boulot, dodo
Location
Watford
Be fine I'd say. I've never had a touring bike, just toured on whatever I happen to have available at the time.
 

skudupnorth

Cycling Skoda lover
I'm planning to ride my hybrid to Cornwall next year and this is how it looks now for the trip.I have changed the seat to a Brooks B17,added Eragon bar ends,SKS mudguards,Altura Arran 36l panniers and Tortec rear pannier.All i need now is more mileage under my belt to be up to the ride !
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Arch

Married to Night Train
Location
Salford, UK
Looks fine. Here's my FCR loading for a weekend of camping in July.

View attachment 4814

That's with tent, sleeping bag, rollmat, clothes (not many, but including sandals to wear in the evening, ditto bikesters, and stuff to sleep in) and all the stuff I carry normally, tools etc. Handling was a bit different to start with, but I soon settled into it.

For an overnight, if you aren't camping, you could get away with one pannier, unless you need a full dress evening suit for apres bike.
 
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Banjo

Banjo

Fuelled with Jelly Babies
Location
South Wales
All sounds very positive,thanks for all the tips suggestions etc.Cant wait to give it a go, if theres any half decent weather I may not even wait for spring, this week seems a bit of a non starter though :-)

I think I will need to be disciplined with kit though, I can fill the panniers on a day out if Im not carefull :-)
 

Arch

Married to Night Train
Location
Salford, UK
Banjo said:
I think I will need to be disciplined with kit though, I can fill the panniers on a day out if Im not carefull :-)

I can be like that. I gather the thing to do is lay out all you think you'll need the day before, then go through it again and again and again, discarding stuff you don't really need.

For example (for a weekend, assuming not camping but B and B or hostel): What tools do you carry? Do you know how to use all of them? If not, leave that one behind. Essentials are probably a multitool, maybe an adjustable spanner, P**ture repair kit, spare tube, pump (get a small one).

Washkit: all you really need is a toothbrush and paste, some sort of soap, a comb and maybe a deodorant. Get travel sized packs, and saw half the handle off a toothbrush (or get one of those travel folding ones), Find a small pouch or makeupbag and make that your washbag, and if something won't fit in, you can't take it. Mine is about 3" by 2". My towel is a quickdry camping towel, not much bigger than a face flannel.

Clothes: one set of cycling gear (lycra dries fast, you can rinse it and dry it overnight if you want to) and one set of 'evening wear' - find things that roll up tight and small. Silk shirts are apparently good. I tend to have a pair of bikesters, and a tee shirt, and to wear whatever longsleeved jersey I've taken. Sandals or flimsy shoes that squash down, assuming you have cycling shoes - if not, just wear trainers for all the time. My bro-in-law did the South Downs Way last year with a mate, and he showed me the photos, including 'getting ready and packing', and I had to stop myself laughing when I saw the two pairs of jeans and some smart shoes...

I'd recommend maybe a non-camping trip to start with, to get a feel for it - there are youth hostels and privately run hostels, if you're on a budget, or B and B's and hotels if not. That way you can have a little luxury and a real bed at the end of the day.:biggrin:
 

willem

Über Member
I think you can easily get the luggage weight of a three season UK/European solo trip down to about 15 kilo. That should not be a problem with just rear panniers, a decent rack, and anything other than a full out racing bike. Next time you change the tyres, go for the widest possible high quality tyre, and next time you change the cassette, have a look to see if your largest sprocket should have more teeth than the current one.
If you want to reduce the weight and volume of your luggage any further, investigate a mattress such as the new Thermarest Neoair (or the Exped downmat for cold weather), look at PhD ultralight sleeping bags and down vests (or Alpkit if budget is really tight), and try a light tent such as a Terra Nova Laser, a Hilleberg Akto or a Helsport Ringstind. For an ultralight footprint for your tent, a sheet of Tyvek cannot be beaten in weight or price. My policy in recent years has been to only replace what was worn, but when I did, to replace it with something really ultralight.
Willem
 
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