Which chain splitting tool?

12boy

Veteran
Location
Casper WY USA
My park Ct5 is at least 10 years old and works like new. Replacement pins are available which I find nice since I've mushroomed the head or bent the pin on many a pin.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
How often do you people actually use chain tools? I only ever use mine to cut a new chain to length. About once a year, if that. Then I fit it and join it with a quick link. Then when the chain is end of life, or if I need to remove it for some other reason, I break the quick link and if necessary rejoin the chain with another quick link.

For on bike use theoretically I might need to use one to remove a damaged link to replace with a spare quick link. I've never needed to do that but it's a possibility. I've also read that you can use them to ease stiff links, but I've never needed to do that. Any stiff links I've had I've just put oil on it and wiggled it around (the stiff link that is).

Am I missing out on some chain-tool related fun?
 

12boy

Veteran
Location
Casper WY USA
You are apparently missing out on the transcendant bliss encountered when you find a tasty POS at a garage sale or the dump (skip to you?) And the chain is shot. And a new one must be fitted.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
You are apparently missing out on the transcendant bliss encountered when you find a tasty POS at a garage sale or the dump (skip to you?) And the chain is shot. And a new one must be fitted.
Well I sometimes do something similar. I might drive a rivet out of an end of life chain rather than going through the rigmarole of getting the "quick" link to release.
 
OP
I like Skol

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
I've got cyclo Rivoli in the garage, mind you they only have to cope with 70-80's kit lol
That's the one I have/had. Both the lower teeth were bent down and cracked. I'm not sure if I have done this inadvertently (unlikely) because it isn't made for 10/11spd chains, or have lent it to someone?
Sorry, but not a fan of the CT-5. I bent the handle on mine a couple of years back on a particularly stubborn extraction.
There should be no need for brute force if the tool is used correctly. Excessive force indicates poor pin alignment and risks damaging the tool and/or chain sides plates if you don't back off and correct the alignment.
...you can do better than the two tools you cited. Those are toys, fit for perhaps, the on-bike toolkit...
Treat yourself with a big, fat chain tool with adjustable bits.....Why fiddle with little levers and inaccurate anvils?
As my previous comment, I see no need for bigger tools with longer handles that can only mean more leverage/force. Yes the modern 9/10/11spd pins can go with a pop but this is still well within the capability of the smaller tools I have linked to. In fact, with the advent of the quicklink, it is really only necessary to split chains nowadays, re-joining chains is something of a rarity for many people.
My park Ct5 is at least 10 years old and works like new. Replacement pins are available which I find nice since I've mushroomed the head or bent the pin on many a pin.
Not sure your comment is a positive endorsement? Does your experience not suggest poor quality pins or careless use of the tool?

My gut instinct is steering me towards the CT-5 as it has a one piece body (no lost removable handles discovered just when you need it most) and 'fine' thread. However, the two comments in this thread about damage occurring in use is worrying so maybe the Topeak one would be safest. I already have other Topeak products that I have been very happy with.
 
OP
I like Skol

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Decided to order the Park Tools CT-5 in the end and it arrived yesterday.
500670


Initial impressions, it looks ok, except for the teeth which look very thin, time will tell. Popped them on the scales and new one is several grams lighter at 77g v 85g so a slight reduction in tool kit weight :rolleyes:
 
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