Which bike tyres to buy?

MichaelW2

Veteran
With any modern wheel you need to check the spokes are correct size and not sticking out inside tyre. Check that rim tape us good and stays in position. Velox is known for reliability. Check for sharp burrs of metal around valve hole and remove with emery/fine sandpaper.
Winter is the time for reliability over speed so a wider, tougher tyre is a good idea. Marathon Plus is known as bomproof but also for being heavy with poor ride. Pick the level of compromise you are happy with.
 
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Anonymous1502

Well-Known Member
I think I will go for the continental grand prix 5000 tyres. They seem to have really good reviews and they aren't too heavy.
 

Cerdic

Active Member
Interesting the number of recommendations for Continental.

I've driven loads of cars fitted with Contis and been very unimpressed and so have never considered them for my bike.

Should I conclude that their car and bike operations share nothing but a logo?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
the gp5000 is meant to be better than the gp4000?
Not necessarily more puncture resistant tho. The 4 seasons would be better for that
 
Anon1502,

Three questions and some suggestions here:

1) What kind of riding are you doing and what bike(s) do you ride? What wheels are you using
(hubs, spokes, rims, rim tape tires, inner tubes)?

Have you checked your wheels to see if any protruding spokes, bad rim tape, rim defects, or other issues (like installing tires with tire irons or screwdrivers) are causing your flats?

Do you ride close to the edge of the road/gutter?

SUGGESTIONS
1) Getting out into the lane (where you'll be safer and more visible) reduces your exposure to glass, nails, and other puncture-causing bits. (Wear bright clothing to increase your visibility, too.)

2) Try to train your eyes to see -- and avoid -- grit, debris, and other signs of puncture-causing &^$! in the roadway. (It's always the glass or nail that you *don't* see that causes the flat but you can avoid more of them.)

3) If you are riding narrow (19-23mm) road tires at very high pressures (110 PSI-plus) and have the frame/brake clearance for them, switch to wider (26-30mm) tires at a lower pressure (65-90 PSI, depending). This will give you a more cushy ride, reduce your flats considerably, and probably decrease (or at least not impair) your rolling resistance.

4) Buy higher-quality tires and tubes. I have been riding Panaracer Paselas for 20+ years with *very few* punctures but they handle decently at speed and are not that heavy. If you want to avoid flats, more rubber (to a point) can be a good thing...

Keep us apprised of your progress in analyzing and fixing your issues...
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
My view is that unless you buy something bomb proof like Marathon Plus, it's a game of chance whether you get a puncture or not. I've had three punctures in a month and also no punctures in 6 months. Same tyres, same riding style.

But you do need to appreciate that the rolling resistance of tyres like Marathon Plus is far higher than something like Continental GP5000. Marathon Plus resistance is about 25W per tyre. GP5000 is about 9W per tyre. So a pair will mean 28W more resistance. That is a lot (I average about 160W on a ride so Marathons would slow me down by about 17%...say 14mph to 11.5mph

This is a very good resource for choosing tyres

Bicycle Rolling Resistance | Rolling Resistance Tests
 
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Anonymous1502

Well-Known Member
Anon1502,

Three questions and some suggestions here:

1) What kind of riding are you doing and what bike(s) do you ride? What wheels are you using
(hubs, spokes, rims, rim tape tires, inner tubes)?

Have you checked your wheels to see if any protruding spokes, bad rim tape, rim defects, or other issues (like installing tires with tire irons or screwdrivers) are causing your flats?

Do you ride close to the edge of the road/gutter?

SUGGESTIONS
1) Getting out into the lane (where you'll be safer and more visible) reduces your exposure to glass, nails, and other puncture-causing bits. (Wear bright clothing to increase your visibility, too.)

2) Try to train your eyes to see -- and avoid -- grit, debris, and other signs of puncture-causing &^$! in the roadway. (It's always the glass or nail that you *don't* see that causes the flat but you can avoid more of them.)

3) If you are riding narrow (19-23mm) road tires at very high pressures (110 PSI-plus) and have the frame/brake clearance for them, switch to wider (26-30mm) tires at a lower pressure (65-90 PSI, depending). This will give you a more cushy ride, reduce your flats considerably, and probably decrease (or at least not impair) your rolling resistance.

4) Buy higher-quality tires and tubes. I have been riding Panaracer Paselas for 20+ years with *very few* punctures but they handle decently at speed and are not that heavy. If you want to avoid flats, more rubber (to a point) can be a good thing...

Keep us apprised of your progress in analyzing and fixing your issues...
Hi,

1. I do urban riding (in the city) I have a road bike (specialized allez e5) . My wheels are:axis sport. I have specialized inner tubes. I don't know what to look for in my wheel, my technical knowledge is nonexistent regarding bikes. I don't ride next to the gutter or the edge of the road.

I live in the city so cycling in quiet lanes is not really a chance. I like to cycle in richmond park though. My tyres are 25x700mm. My tyres pressure is usually 90-100psi.
 

Scottish Scrutineer

Senior Member
Location
Fife, Scotland
Schwalbe Marathon Greenguards are decent compromise of puncture and rolling resistance and are not as heavy as Marathon Plus. If you are riding in urban areas having the lightest tyres is probably not a priority. ~You could also consider fitting wider (28mm) tyres, or even going tubeless if your rims are suitable.
 
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