What Bike?

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
Had no problems with the saddle yet but it's only 7 miles to work so at that distance I won't find out. The seatpost has suspension so that would help too.

Something I feel I do need to change are the pedals. I use SPDs on my road bike so I don't want to get used riding the touring bike without them because I may forget when on road bike but I have found that sometimes I have to keep taking feet off pedals a lot especially when off-road so I am getting one-sided SPD pedals such as Shimano M324s and cycling shoes with grips for flat pedal riding such as O'Neal Flow SPD shoes
I know nothing about SPD pedals. I only ride on flats. Currently experimenting with toe-clips to prevent slips in the wet.

As for the commute, well, now you have the chance to try out lots of different things such as GPS apps on your phone, a little creative route planning with different resources, maybe trying out different surfaces if that's an option. A 7 mile trip to work can easily become a 25 mile trip on the way home with lots of time to test different scenarios and bike handling.

I've found the positioning of the saddle can be as important as the saddle itself. And that can take a lot of tiny adjustments to get just right.
 
Location
London
I've found the positioning of the saddle can be as important as the saddle itself. And that can take a lot of tiny adjustments to get just right.
Very true. One almost caused me a life changing injury. Moved it and it became very comfortable.
 
OP
GmanUK65

GmanUK65

Senior Member
Personally, I think that's too expensive just for practising or figuring things out.
I know someone who'd say "It's very easy to go broke saving money!".
It's also heavy for what you're getting 3,4 kg.

Good advice to look at backpacker's sites.
Look for someone local, second hand tent. Get them to pitch it out for you, go through all the things to watch out for.
Seriously, I wouldn't consider anything over 35-40 quid.
Sorry about the earlier post and I am missing the good advice you gave me. You don't have to answer to this if you don't want to but just thought I would let you know I have ordered a cheap tent (Vango Soul 200), sleeping bag, sleeping mat and cooking stuff. I should be going for my first camp in about 2 weeks, I've even found the campsite to go to
 

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
Sorry about the earlier post and I am missing the good advice you gave me. You don't have to answer to this if you don't want to but just thought I would let you know I have ordered a cheap tent (Vango Soul 200), sleeping bag, sleeping mat and cooking stuff. I should be going for my first camp in about 2 weeks, I've even found the campsite to go to
Well, then, you’re all ready to rock’n’roll then!^_^

Pics are obligatory!

Have a good look at gear lists so that you don’t forget anything essential!
Try to practise pitching the tent at home, or in a park before you go (learned from bitter experience!)^_^^_^
The bike will probably feel weird at first, when loaded. The good thing is that after the weekend, your commute will seem a whole lot easier!^_^

I appreciate your apology. It takes guts to apologise.
I wish you had simply sent a Personal Message rather than criticise me so publicly.
Since I’ve been advocating you get on your bike and get away, and you’re all set to do that now, then there’s not much more for me to add.

There’s something wonderful and primitive, relaxing and free about heading off somewhere different and bringing all that you need with you to survive and be comfortable.

Enjoy!
 
OP
GmanUK65

GmanUK65

Senior Member
Well, then, you’re all ready to rock’n’roll then!^_^

Pics are obligatory!

Have a good look at gear lists so that you don’t forget anything essential!
Try to practise pitching the tent at home, or in a park before you go (learned from bitter experience!)^_^^_^
The bike will probably feel weird at first, when loaded. The good thing is that after the weekend, your commute will seem a whole lot easier!^_^

I appreciate your apology. It takes guts to apologise.
I wish you had simply sent a Personal Message rather than criticise me so publicly.
Since I’ve been advocating you get on your bike and get away, and you’re all set to do that now, then there’s not much more for me to add.

There’s something wonderful and primitive, relaxing and free about heading off somewhere different and bringing all that you need with you to survive and be comfortable.

Enjoy!
Yes you're right a private message would have been better, but I did not know how to send one otherwise I would have
 

Lee-M

Active Member
My budget would be around £1000 to 1400
I see your budget but you won't be disappointed with the updated Trek 920 . I'm not too sure on the benefits of a steel frame for touring apart from the obvious repair aspects, but when in all honesty is this going to be needed . I have a Ridgeback steel frame and it feels no more or less comfortable than the ali frame of the 920 . The Trek rolls really well, is racked up ready to go and the hydraulic brakes will stop on a six pence.
 
OP
GmanUK65

GmanUK65

Senior Member
I see your budget but you won't be disappointed with the updated Trek 920 . I'm not too sure on the benefits of a steel frame for touring apart from the obvious repair aspects, but when in all honesty is this going to be needed . I have a Ridgeback steel frame and it feels no more or less comfortable than the ali frame of the 920 . The Trek rolls really well, is racked up ready to go and the hydraulic brakes will stop on a six pence.
That budget was if I waited for 18 months but I realised I NEEDED one earlier so opted for the £700 Dawes Karakum on 18 month finance.
 

Lee-M

Active Member
I NEEDED one earlier so opted for the £700 Dawes Karakum
I'm pleased you got your bike . Happy touring .
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
Photo Winner
Genesis bikes are excellent. I have the Genesis Croix de fer 30. My friend rode with one and completed the TCR last year. I will be riding the Tuscany Road on mine next month.

Its a lovely touring bike. Its comfortable and quick. I usually go for 105 group sets and above. But thd Tiagra has been faultless in the 2 years I have had it.

I have ridden 6000km on it this year and have not done anything but kept it clean and oiled.
 

minininjarob

Active Member
Dawes have always been up and down with their race and MTB bikes but their touring bikes have always been ace. Maybe not the coolest trends in design or the absolute latest equipment but great purposeful touring machines at a good range of prices. The Karakum is a great bike and will do you proud. I have a friend who has a Robloff equipped Thorn tourer but also a Karakum - he rides the Dawes much more often!!
 
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