Webuyanycar

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
When Joe Public buys a car it must be immaculate in all respects. When they sel one obvuous faults are usually listed as "an easy fix" or "a cheap repair", which begs the question why didn't they fix the fault before advertising it if its so easy and cheap?

Buyers are quick to moan about the motor trade, but even quicker to play the same games themselves if they think they can get away with it.
 

RichardB

Slightly retro
Location
West Wales
When Joe Public buys a car it must be immaculate in all respects. When they sel one obvuous faults are usually listed as "an easy fix" or "a cheap repair", which begs the question why didn't they fix the fault before advertising it if its so easy and cheap?

Buyers are quick to moan about the motor trade, but even quicker to play the same games themselves if they think they can get away with it.
My favourite is "Will pass MoT easy".

If it will do that, MoT it yourself for under £50, and slap £200 on the price by adding "full year's MoT" to the description. Or maybe you aren't that confident.

Also, "reluctant sale". FFS, what does that actually mean?
 

Cavalol

Guru
Location
Chester
We need some e-role play here. I'll be WBAC, Dave can be some early twenties MILF who's pregnant again and desperately needs the money to buy a bigger car. You play the accounts manager and fire up the PDF about the wrong coloured floor mats/tyre valves at a jaunty angle/undisclosed leaf on scuttle tray, and then pull his pants up after we buy it for £53. Minus admin fees.
 

lane

Über Member
Used them a few years ago when I was geting my current car. The final valuation was slightly less than the initial web offer, but they didn't knock as much off as I expeted at the physical inspection and it was still over 25% more than I'd been offered as a part exchange. Guaranteed quick sale, no hassle waiting for tyre kickers to turn up or not, no worries about waiting for cheques to clear/bounce or fake cash/bank drafts being handed over and it was only a 15 minute walk from dropping the old car off to where I was collecting my new one.

The only downside was that it took a week or two for the money to be transferred to my account, but this was all covered & explained at the inspection and when signing the paperwork.
Which is ok provided they don't go out of business in the meantime and leave you a few grand out of pocket
 

lane

Über Member
Reading this glad I always run cars into the ground to the point I get a couple of hundred trade in or even take them to the scrap yard
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Im pretty confident in saying that im now on my last ever car, and when im finished with it the the valuable parts are going on ebay and the carcass to the scappy.
 

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
We need some e-role play here. I'll be WBAC, Dave can be some early twenties MILF who's pregnant again and desperately needs the money to buy a bigger car. You play the accounts manager and fire up the PDF about the wrong coloured floor mats/tyre valves at a jaunty angle/undisclosed leaf on scuttle tray, and then pull his pants up after we buy it for £53. Minus admin fees.
Listen to me MATEY... ....this beautiful car has only ever left the showroom once. Driven by a 95 year old Sunday school teacher.
^_^^_^^_^
 

icowden

Über Member
Location
Surrey
I am speaking from many years of motor trade experience dealing with the general public, I have done as does a lot of the motor trade used WBAC for valuations, your experience comes from? If somebody offers you a car describing it as nice condition and you get there and see it is not do you hand over all your money.
But that isn't what WBAC does. They ask you about your car. You describe it. They then make up a valuation and tell you to bring the car in. Of course people are going to be dishonest, fail to describe the car properly etc. So don't offer as high a value in the first place. Surprise the seller by offering more than they thought they were going to get rather than annoy the seller by cutting the price right down once they are there in person.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
But that isn't what WBAC does. They ask you about your car. You describe it. They then make up a valuation and tell you to bring the car in. Of course people are going to be dishonest, fail to describe the car properly etc. So don't offer as high a value in the first place. Surprise the seller by offering more than they thought they were going to get rather than annoy the seller by cutting the price right down once they are there in person.
Describe it right and you get the right price. Not everyone is dishonest like you portray.
 
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