Training for some light touring

Sun cream - the sun will be shining
He said Scotland.
 
I agree about not taking too much notice of gym results.

Riding a simulator is not the same as riding a real bicycle, not least because you are indoors.

You might be surprised at how quickly and how far your spirits fall if you are faced with a headwind, a climb, adverse weather, or even all three.

Equally, there will be times when you have a fine day, a tailwind, and a downhill gradient when you will think you can ride for ever.

Route finding, booking places to stay, and looking after you and the kit are all part of the fun, but are also a mental challenge, adding to tiredness.

In other words, the only way to train for riding a bicycle is to ride a bicycle.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
I agree about not taking too much notice of gym results.

Riding a simulator is not the same as riding a real bicycle, not least because you are indoors.

You might be surprised at how quickly and how far your spirits fall if you are faced with a headwind, a climb, adverse weather, or even all three.

Equally, there will be times when you have a fine day, a tailwind, and a downhill gradient when you will think you can ride for ever.

Route finding, booking places to stay, and looking after you and the kit are all part of the fun, but are also a mental challenge, adding to tiredness.

In other words, the only way to train for riding a bicycle is to ride a bicycle.
Indeed you’re basically turning pedals and making your heart pump a bit faster and getting a bit sweaty. Nothing like propelling yourself and bike and kit along a potentially bumpy holey road that might be going up or down with wind, rain, sun coming at you :smile: not to mention other road users, stopping and starting at junctions etc
 
Indeed you’re basically turning pedals and making your heart pump a bit faster and getting a bit sweaty. Nothing like propelling yourself and bike and kit along a potentially bumpy holey road that might be going up or down with wind, rain, sun coming at you :smile: not to mention other road users, stopping and starting at junctions etc
I believe balance also comes into it - core strength used to balance a real bicycle is more fatiguing than being slumped like a sack of spuds on a fixed exercise bike.
 

PaulSB

Legendary Member
About GPS, do you mean one of those you keep on the handlebar or one of those sportswatches with built-in GPS?
Yes a handlebar mounted GPS navigation device. You will get a hundred different opinions on this. The two best known makes are Garmin and Wahoo. I've used a Garmin 810 for many years and ditched it 15 months ago in favour of a Wahoo Elemnt. In my opinion the Wahoo is a significantly superior device, mine has yet to fail me. My Garmin on the other hand frequently crashed, lost the route etc.

If you want this type of device get a Wahoo.

You can use a GPS watch but while this will easily record your ride it is very difficult, though not impossible, to use one for navigation. Wrist mounted devices are not built with the intention of being a navigation device.
 

YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
He said Scotland.
Rain cream then , to stop you turning too blue from rain burn.
 

PaulSB

Legendary Member
Oh yes, I already know I'll be travelling super light. Just a handlebar bag with the bare essentials. I will be eating out and sleeping in bnb's so for 3 days all I think I'm going to need to pack is:
- 2 pairs of socks
- 2 pairs of bike shorts
- 2/3 tshirts
- waterproof/windproof jacket
- puncture repair kit with a couple of spare inner tubes
- I don't know.....plasters? :/

Actually, what would you add to the list? :smile:
Personally I think you'll need a rack with either a large bag or panniers. For 3-4 days I have a rack mounted bag with side pockets which roll out to form small "panniers."

You're riding in Scotland and as you've said you can have four seasons in a day. My last tour in Scotland was from Lancashire >Outer Hebrides >Ullapool >Inverness. I had beautiful weather for the entire tour except the last day when I rode 70 miles from Ullapool to Inverness in to the teeth of an easterly wind and pouring rain. I had a full set of waterproofs, extra layers and was still miserably wet and cold in July. I suggest for a Scottish tour you need to be prepared for most weather conditions.

Be sure to pack everything in plastic bags inside your bag, panniers or whatever.

Depending on where you're riding you may need to consider carrying extra food and water. I've been on several tours and had days when I found virtually nowhere to get essentials. The day described above was one of them apart from one very rural pub which offered the world's best soup - that's how it felt at the time!

My kit list for Scotland would be:

2 x cycle shirts
1 x , perhaps 2 x, pair of bib shorts.
One pair of walking trousers with zip off legs for evening
Waterproof jacket
Waterproof trousers
2 x socks
1 x T shirt
1 x micro fleece
1 x underwear
Plasters
Pain killers
Multitool
2 x tubes
Puncture kit
Zip ties
Tyre boot
Pocket knife
Whistle to attract attention when in ditch
Sudocreme
Toothbrush
Toothpaste
Spare nuts and bolts for rack
Pump
Tyre levers
2 x Waterbottle
Energy bars
Energy tablets
Food
Power pack
Phone
Maps
Survival blanket
Phone charger
GPS charger

There is probably other stuff which I've forgotten as I haven't toured for three years. Much will depend on how rural you are. If you're riding round the Borders you could ditch some of this. The places I go I need to be prepared for seeing nothing all day.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
A fair fitness person can easily do 60 miles a day for two to four days. Its about pace and taking breaks. 10- 12mph is a steady pace on a geared bike. Ride for two hours max and have a little break/snack/pot of tea then continue. 6 hours over a whole day should be doable

Training, just ride your bike increasing ride times upto 4hours. Have a break during these longer rides working upto doing 2hour non stop.

I rarely ride more than 2 hours without a small stop, which is plenty to refuel and have a drink. Continue on journey

A
fast
two hour ride will see nearly 40 miles completed A steady ride will see 40 miles in 3-3.5hours.
 
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YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
Get riding outdoors is your main consideration right now. You need to get used to all the things that can and do happen outdoors that are not necessarily fitness related.

I wouldn't pay too much attention to speed on an indoor stationary bike. It's fairly meaningless measure compared to what you will do outdoors.
 

mudsticks

Über Member
Sounds like you're probs fit enough already.

I maintain a general level of fitness through work, fairly regular day bike rides of varying length and hill walking.

My touring stuff comprises the full camping kit too - lightweight - but it adds up to a bit, and slows things down somewhat.

If you're credit card touring then you're not going to need much mores than what PaulSB has detailed.

Maybe you could fit it all into a stem bag if you don't want panniers?

I usually just get a bit fitter as the tour goes on, or if I'm feeling tired i'll just do an easier stretch.
But very rarely more than 60 miles a day.

I like to stop and look at things, and eat local cake, where possible to me that's most of the point of going.

But I know the number crunching, and milage is important to some, and that's fine too.

Probs your main issue will be undercarriage comfort, as others have said, good shorts, a saddle that suits, and a bit of self care should help with that.
 

PaulSB

Legendary Member
If you haven't yet got cycling shoes I would suggest SPD pedals and shoes. These are much easier to walk in and can be worn in the evening negating the need to carry street shoes.

Get some small vacuum bags to pack clothes in. You lay the clothing flat in the bag, roll it up very tightly to expel air and create a vacuum which self seals. Clothes are bulky and this reduces bulk by two-thirds.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
If you haven't yet got cycling shoes I would suggest SPD pedals and shoes. These are much easier to walk in and can be worn in the evening negating the need to carry street shoes.

Get some small vacuum bags to pack clothes in. You lay the clothing flat in the bag, roll it up very tightly to expel air and create a vacuum which self seals. Clothes are bulky and this reduces bulk by two-thirds.
Or just cycle in normal shoes which can be worn (some sort of overshoes good if rain anticipated)
 
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