Top Touring Tips

Location
London
my top touring tip is to actually do the tour.

I joined CC eight years ago looking for some touring tips. I got the pannier racks, the panniers, the small pack tent, the downmat sleeping mat and the frame thing that makes it into a seat, the tangia-a-like stove, and pretty much everything else. It's all ready and packed into the panniers so i can just clip 'em on and go... but i haven't actually gone anywhere. :blush:
Quite a common thing - easy to get enchanted by kit touring - very big of you to admit your "failing" - you are in a beautiful part of the world - still not too late this year to go out if only for a couple of nights. Over the hills with you to the Ribble Valley. Or if you are in Lancaster you can of course get a train to other beautiful parts very easily.
 

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
Quite a common thing - easy to get enchanted by kit touring - very big of you to admit your "failing" - you are in a beautiful part of the world - still not too late this year to go out if only for a couple of nights. Over the hills with you to the Ribble Valley. Or if you are in Lancaster you can of course get a train to other beautiful parts very easily.
Now iv'e got the kit (and have had for years)... its just a case of finding the time (and to an extent, the money, and to a lesser extent, the weather). Two days off work together are few and far between these days.
 
Location
London
you need sod all money to tour veda - I've been on trips that were cheaper than staying at home. Weather can be a "challenge" :smile: in your neck of the woods, but on the other hand there is no such thing as bad weather, just ......

Go for an overnighter. The Trough? By train to the edge of the Dales?

On the other hand, if you want to sell me some premium touring gear at an advantageous price, feel free.

Just don't say that I didn't encourage you to get out there.
 
If you want small/robust and pretty cheap (and I'm no fan of using phones for this - folk finding that their FB twiddling has screwed their GPS battery as the wolves circle) I can recommend the Garmin Etrex 20. Or the 20x, which has more memory and apparently a higher resolution screen, though some will advise (I don't know) that the latter feature makes the screen, counter-intuitively for a non techie like me, less readable.

Etrex 20 now superseded but will still be available used via ebay. I have one - any questions fire away.

Very tough. Highly waterproof. Runs off two AAs which can be rechargeable so you can carry and pop in spares as needed - only the most foolish with a death wish will run out of power. The extra memory of the 20x isn't strictly necessary. The memory stores waypoints essentially. Has a card for putting maps on. I use maps for free from

http://www.openfietsmap.nl/

essentially these are Open Street maps flavourised. check out the website to see how the global community-generated maps are in your patch. Even if the maps are poor in your area or you manage to screw the installed maps, you can of course get the unit to straight line point to a chosen point on planet earth or to a waypoint you had previously put in. You can of course get it to plot your outward ride and then just follow your line back.

If it helps convince you, for years I laughed at the things but am now a convert. No need to spend more than the 20 or 20x, in fact some of the more expensive Garmins are in my view less fit for purpose. Quite rare to see the Garmin Etrex 20/x in a UK bike shop as they would prefer to sell you something more expensive. A very good compact handlebar mount is available from Garmin though I advise also looping a small light lanyard through the bar. Recently rode 140 miles through the night in the UK with mine or a route I had previously put in - faultless and still battery power left at the end.
Oh wow what a great reply Blue Hills noting all things and I will search those maps.. etc. Thankyou.
 
Now iv'e got the kit (and have had for years)... its just a case of finding the time (and to an extent, the money, and to a lesser extent, the weather). Two days off work together are few and far between these days.
A thing I like to is pack Thursday ride to work Friday. Fin work Fri Ride and Camp Friday night. Home Saturday. I call these " Friday nighters"
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
Runs off two AAs . . . so you can carry . . . spares as needed - only the most foolish with a death wish will run out of power.
I'd just point out that the chance of a rider (even a foolish one) dying if their little electronic device runs out of power is not significantly increased. Just saying. If touring, carry a (large scale eg 1:200,000) paper map, if only as a back up.
 

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
Oh wow what a great reply Blue Hills noting all things and I will search those maps.. etc. Thankyou.
@Blue Hills advice about the e-trex is spot on (from what I've read - not used the unit).

But... before you pull the trigger, try to make contact with people who use the device in similar locations and ways that you intend to use it. You have very specific needs (bush), so it doesn't matter a lot how the device operates in Europe or elsewhere.

by the way.... touring in the bush! Fantastic!!
 

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
my top touring tip is to actually do the tour.

I joined CC eight years ago looking for some touring tips. I got the pannier racks, the panniers, the small pack tent, the downmat sleeping mat and the frame thing that makes it into a seat, the tangia-a-like stove, and pretty much everything else. It's all ready and packed into the panniers so i can just clip 'em on and go... but i haven't actually gone anywhere. :blush:
You're far from alone in that. I know several people with bikes and gear far "superior" to what I ride on...... but it never gets used.
And, Every. Single. Time. I go away, whether for an overnight or longer, I will meet people who express a desire to do what I am doing, but are convinced that they "can't".


Now iv'e got the kit (and have had for years)... its just a case of finding the time (and to an extent, the money, and to a lesser extent, the weather). Two days off work together are few and far between these days.
I can relate to that.
I changed my job. One of the best things I ever did. Turns out that all those hours weren't just a negative for my touring! :blush: But extreme for many.

I've always thought the most difficult thing to get right in Touring (like a lot of things) is the attitude. There are people who acquire the gear, but never venture off, and there are those that do a long tour and find it hard to climb back on a bike again.

Without meaning to be confrontational, have you ever asked yourself why you haven't gone on a trip?
You've mentioned time, money and weather. All valid. But in a timespan of 8 years, a little difficult to swallow :smile:.
Have you planned a trip? Sometimes just researching a route can be enough to fire up the juices and provide some momentum. CrazyGuyOnABike.com is full of journals, some better than others, but many are pure inspiration!

The thing is, and this is the paradox, that once you've done a little tour or 2, you'll understand exactly why you want to do it. The only problem is getting the first one under your belt.

Good Luck!
 
Location
London
@Blue Hills advice about the e-trex is spot on (from what I've read - not used the unit).

But... before you pull the trigger, try to make contact with people who use the device in similar locations and ways that you intend to use it. You have very specific needs (bush), so it doesn't matter a lot how the device operates in Europe or elsewhere.

by the way.... touring in the bush! Fantastic!!
Not picking an argument hobbes (I always value your posts) but why should the bit of the planet matter? If OSM maps are weak there, it will affect a lot of other devices. Other bought maps are available for Garmins. Presumably the Garmin Etrex 20 can see the sky as well as it can in Europe or its US home? And surely it will still function as a straight line pointer, or provide a bread trail highlight to be followed back?
 
Location
London
I'd just point out that the chance of a rider (even a foolish one) dying if their little electronic device runs out of power is not significantly increased. Just saying. If touring, carry a (large scale eg 1:200,000) paper map, if only as a back up.
Might do in certain areas. Our australian contributor sounded a tad concerned. Good advice to always carry a map for sure. But you do need to know where you are. I will admit that I don't tour in such "extreme" areas.
 

Vantage

The dogs chew toy
my top touring tip is to actually do the tour.

I joined CC eight years ago looking for some touring tips. I got the pannier racks, the panniers, the small pack tent, the downmat sleeping mat and the frame thing that makes it into a seat, the tangia-a-like stove, and pretty much everything else. It's all ready and packed into the panniers so i can just clip 'em on and go... but i haven't actually gone anywhere. :blush:
Similar story here.
Bought the bike specifically to go touring when I returned to cycling 7 years ago.
Started off to go somewhere but just didn't get there. It's happened twice now.
3rd attempt in exactly 2 weeks from today. Hopefully 3rd time lucky!
 
Location
London
Similar story here.
Bought the bike specifically to go touring when I returned to cycling 7 years ago.
Started off to go somewhere but just didn't get there. It's happened twice now.
3rd attempt in exactly 2 weeks from today. Hopefully 3rd time lucky!
Can we ask where you are going?

explanation - Vantage isn't psychic - I deleted a just earlier post due to a formatting screw-up - and reposted.
 
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