Sub 2 hour marathon.

pjd57

Veteran
Location
Glasgow
Amazing achievement.
All this talk about it not being an official record seems pointless since it's a marathon where you can't really compare one course to another.
 

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
No, I think this is very different to Paula's record.

Paula's was in an actual race, and the only reason she got any issues was because men were competing at the same time. For Kipchoge, everything was perfect;y set up for him- he had a number of pacers swapping in and out, especially for him, and they were also clustered round the reduce wind resistance to the absolute minimum- the car also helped with this and provided a laser showing how to stay in that formation. Plus the hydration and feeding differences.
Paula had dedicated pacers too, the only reason Kipchoge had to swap his out is because he was too fast for them to keep up.
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
Sorry, but it doesn't impress me, until it's done in an actual race, with no laser pointing out "ideal" pace.
Of course, there could be pacemakers employed in an actual race, but it's not the artificial event that has been created here.
Whilst I don't think it is comparable to an open race I'd be interested to know what it would take to impress you.
I suspect he is the only person in the world to be able to have done what he did. So, in that context, impressive
 

Kempstonian

Has the memory of a goldfish
Location
Bedford
It seems to me that they just wanted to see if the human body was capable of running a marathon in under two hours. Now they know it is. One day somebody WILL do it in a normal race - but that day may be some time away yet.

The reason official records have to be set under specific rules is because its quite important that there's a level playing field (as far as possible) so the efforts are comparable. It has to be the same for everybody. There used to be a big fuss about some records being set at altitude but now its easy for athletes & cyclists to both train and compete at altitude. The facilities are there and getting to these places has become easier.

I don't really like pacemakers, but if there are pacemakers for an athlete there's nothing to stop other athletes taking advantage of them too. All they have to do is keep up!
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
It seems to me that they just wanted to see if the human body was capable of running a marathon in under two hours. Now they know it is. One day somebody WILL do it in a normal race - but that day may be some time away yet.

The reason official records have to be set under specific rules is because its quite important that there's a level playing field (as far as possible) so the efforts are comparable. It has to be the same for everybody. There used to be a big fuss about some records being set at altitude but now its easy for athletes & cyclists to both train and compete at altitude. The facilities are there and getting to these places has become easier.

I don't really like pacemakers, but if there are pacemakers for an athlete there's nothing to stop other athletes taking advantage of them too. All they have to do is keep up!
Apparently for a race to be a valid marathon for record purposes the finish must be no further than 13 miles from the start. I think it would be pretty easy to set up a valid course that would have a significant tailwind advantage. At the speed these guys run, wind resistance must be a major component. You could even do the headwind bits in amongst tall buildings to mitigate the effect
 

Kempstonian

Has the memory of a goldfish
Location
Bedford
Some marathon facts:

American Larry Macon holds the record for the most marathons run in a year. Between 1 December 2012 and 30 November 2013 he ran 239. I don't think any were under 2 hours!
btw Larry was 69 years old.
It was the fourth time he had broken that record, running 6,261.8 in a 12 month period. In 2017 (when he was 72) he was officially the first American to run 2000 marathons.
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Stefaan Engels (born 7 April 1961, Ghent, Belgium), also known as "marathon man", is a Belgian marathoner and triathlete, the first man to run the marathon distance 365 consecutive times in a single year. He also holds the record for the most Ironman Triathlons in a year with 20 over 2007 and 2008.
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Ricardo Abad Martínez (Tafalla, January 8, 1971) is a Spanish ultrarunner. He holds the world record for consecutive marathons run on consecutive days, 607. He is famous for executing the project "500 marathons in 500 days", in which he completed 500 marathons in 500 consecutive days.
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From October 12-15, 2005, Dean Karnazes ran 350 miles across Northern California without stopping. He didn't stop to sleep or to eat, or – in the most stupefying accomplishment of all – he did not even slow down to sample a Sonoma Valley chilled chardonnay. All told, he ran for 80 hours, 44 minutes without a break.
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Mind boggling, isn't it? :eek:
 
OP
Beebo

Beebo

Firm and Fruity
Location
Hexleybeef
Apparently for a race to be a valid marathon for record purposes the finish must be no further than 13 miles from the start. I think it would be pretty easy to set up a valid course that would have a significant tailwind advantage. At the speed these guys run, wind resistance must be a major component. You could even do the headwind bits in amongst tall buildings to mitigate the effect
There is also a maximum elevation drop to ensure they aren’t just running down hill.
Parameters in athletics are not a new thing, wind speed is important in sprint races and long jump. Records don’t count if the tail wind is too high.
 

Flakey

Active Member
Apparently for a race to be a valid marathon for record purposes the finish must be no further than 13 miles from the start. I think it would be pretty easy to set up a valid course that would have a significant tailwind advantage. At the speed these guys run, wind resistance must be a major component. You could even do the headwind bits in amongst tall buildings to mitigate the effect
Yup. Thats one of the reasons that the Baxters Loch Ness marathon will never "count" if a record were achieved. Its pretty much a 24 mile straight line (before doubling back for the last couple of miles). It's also got too large an overall decent for it to count (despite a nasty climb at 18 mile) AND if your lucky the prevailing wind provides a tail wind for most of it.
But the good thing is times gained at Loch Ness still count towards "good for age" entries for the likes of London.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
This is like the cycling speed records slipstreaming behind a car. It is a record, it is cycling but it is not a race.
Having broken the 2hr bar, the psychological barrier has been smashed and we may see these times in marathon races.
 
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