Social distancing

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
As our dearly beloved government has been pushing the need for social distancing recently to slow the transmission of this horrid virus, and as a somewhat introverted and misanthropic soul by nature I took this to head for the hills so to speak and seek out solitude in nature. I often photograph these places when I visit.

Last Sunday's ride through the Glenveagh Park, now officially closed, it is nicer now that there is nobody else there though I miss the cafe stop as the cafe has closed for the duration of the "emergency."
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I posted this yesterday in a different thread. I had this photo in mind for some time, just waiting for the correct sunset opportunity. I drove to one of my favourite beaches last night after work. It was a surprise to find three others on the beach as it's off the beaten track and you have to walk across fields and climb down cliffs or sand dunes to get there. I usually have it to myself. It was worth the trip though. The sunset was glorious.
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Today I was busy with other things but made time for a walk along an old bridal way near where I grew up. I suspect that the only person within a two mile radius was the guy ploughing a field at the wheel of an ancient Ford tractor in preparation for this year's potato crop. The scents of nature were inter-mingled with the scent of hot oil and diesel fumes. Old Fords never die and all of that, nice to see it working and not used as an over-restored show piece. The smell of my childhood as I grew up surrounded by ancient farm machinery and lorries. It's not a a brilliant photo by any means but I often walked along here as a boy as it was a short cut to the shop or to school.
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Does anyone else have photos taken whilst "social distancing" in remote(ish) places?
 

raleighnut

Guru
Location
On 3 Wheels
Lovely sunset :becool:
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
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It was only me doing this, this afternoon.


Sometimes I feel like "The Little Red Hen"
 
OP
tyred

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
Did 40 odd local miles this morning on my "new" toy - a Raleigh Pioneer built as a fixed wheeler. These are the components from what used to be my winter fixed wheeler built on a basic steel road frame but I never felt comfortable on that bike as the top tube was a bit long for my build so I re-homed the components. Easing myself back into fixed wheel riding gradually as I haven't rode fixed much in a few years. Very impressed with this bike really, these are a great frame. I couldn't resist the unsealed road which runs alongside Lough Gartan. Nobody around quite early in the morning.
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mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
Did 40 odd local miles this morning on my "new" toy - a Raleigh Pioneer built as a fixed wheeler. These are the components from what used to be my winter fixed wheeler built on a basic steel road frame but I never felt comfortable on that bike as the top tube was a bit long for my build so I re-homed the components. Easing myself back into fixed wheel riding gradually as I haven't rode fixed much in a few years. Very impressed with this bike really, these are a great frame. I couldn't resist the unsealed road which runs alongside Lough Gartan. Nobody around quite early in the morning.
View attachment 509849

Oh Scotshire.. :smile: Sigh.

Would usually come up for a decent bout of hillwalking May/June..

But looks highly unlikely now.

Still, mustn't grumble.. There are worse places to be 'stuck' than Devon in springtime.
 
OP
tyred

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
View attachment 509679

But yes old Ford's do go on forever.

Mines slightly more recent vintage, than a classic Fordson.. Early seventies but she keeps up the pace.

Just about to start her up now :okay:
I love the Ford Force 4000. We had one when I was growing up (along with a much older MF65 which I learned to drive on - aged about 5!). Lovely and unique sounding engines (although some could be reluctant to start) and much better brakes and steering than the MF165. My Uncle still owns the 4600 he bought new in 1977 (still in everyday use) and neighbour at home has a Ford 5000 for over 40 years. I often worked with the 5000 too but never liked it, heavy to steer and clumsy and doesn't really pull any better than a 4000. I note your 4000 has power steering, very few Fords of that era had but you need it if you want a front end loader.

I am no longer involved in agriculture at the moment following a row with my brother but I still own a Fordson Super Dexta and an MF165. There are in storage at my parents. I hope to find work for them at some point in the futire.
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
I love the Ford Force 4000. We had one when I was growing up (along with a much older MF65 which I learned to drive on - aged about 5!). Lovely and unique sounding engines (although some could be reluctant to start) and much better brakes and steering than the MF165. My Uncle still owns the 4600 he bought new in 1977 (still in everyday use) and neighbour at home has a Ford 5000 for over 40 years. I often worked with the 5000 too but never liked it, heavy to steer and clumsy and doesn't really pull any better than a 4000. I note your 4000 has power steering, very few Fords of that era had but you need it if you want a front end loader.

I am no longer involved in agriculture at the moment following a row with my brother but I still own a Fordson Super Dexta and an MF165. There are in storage at my parents. I hope to find work for them at some point in the futire.
Yes it has served me extraordinarily well for the past fourteen years or so.

Really has some pulling power, I have a mahoosive set of discs, which I use instead of ploughing generally.

She's very nimble.

The loader is hydraulic now, but converted from an old trip loader,so getting it to cooperate requires some nifty lever work.

I had the wheels turned 'inside out' to accommodate my preferred working bed width..

Once I've done final cultivations, in some areas the wheelings become person paths for crop maintenance.

Right now I'm looking for a slightly larger, maybe 4wd with a better loader for materials handling compost / muck / wood chip - to add to my armoury. :rolleyes:

Then I'd take the loader off this one and use it just for field, and trailer work.

I even have aspirations for a Massey.:blush:

You're right though there's nothing like the rattle of this particular model.


Goes, and goes, and goes, all day, and very fuel efficient too. :okay:
 
OP
tyred

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
Yes it has served me extraordinarily well for the past fourteen years or so.

Really has some pulling power, I have a mahoosive set of discs, which I use instead of ploughing generally.

She's very nimble.

The loader is hydraulic now, but converted from an old trip loader,so getting it to cooperate requires some nifty lever work.

I had the wheels turned 'inside out' to accommodate my preferred working bed width..

Once I've done final cultivations, in some areas the wheelings become person paths for crop maintenance.

Right now I'm looking for a slightly larger, maybe 4wd with a better loader for materials handling compost / muck / wood chip - to add to my armoury. :rolleyes:

Then I'd take the loader off this one and use it just for field, and trailer work.

I even have aspirations for a Massey.:blush:

You're right though there's nothing like the rattle of this particular model.


Goes, and goes, and goes, all day, and very fuel efficient too. :okay:
If you're looking for something more modern with 4WD, I'd look at Zetors or Lamborghini/Same as they are better value for money than an MF. I must admit to a soft spot for Zetor, the Czechs are great engineers.
 
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