Repair of a Tern Link D8

Marli

New Member
My Tern hit a car that pulled out in front of me on a roundabout. The front wheel is badly buckled and there are a few other issues, but the one I am most concerned about is the central folding mechanism. The lever seems to be stuck and I don't know whether the mechanism is broken. I want the bike to be repaired but how can I be sure that the frame's integrity is tested to ensure my future safety. Also, although the driver has admitted fault, the insurance company want to fob me off with the bike's current value, but I do not want a second-hand bike whose history I do not know, which may fail at some point in the near future. Is there some accreditation I should be checking of the bike repairer?
 

boydj

Guru
Location
Paisley
The insurance company should be reinstating your bike and you should be using a qualified/certified repairer to do so - get at least one quote for the work. You should also be compensated for any injuries and for the fear/fright/shock that came from the incident and also for the extra costs involved in not being able to use your bike, such as bus/train fares. Decide what you consider a reasonable sum to cover all these costs and add some negotiating room and go back to the insurer, advising them that if they don't play ball then you'll have to get a cycling specialist lawyer involved.

I've been through this and the insurance company settled quickly - partly, I think because the compensation I claimed was only £500 for a bruised backside which made me miss an important golf competition and an end-of-season full club run on the bike - on top of the documented repair to the bike.

As a general rule, never accept the first offer from an insurance company.
 
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Marli

New Member
Thank you so much for your reply. I would have no issue if my bike could be repaired, but I cannot find anyone who can tell me how they test the stability of the frame. It's a folding bike and I'm worried that the impact of the collision (if the lever/mechanism can be made to work again) may have weakened the hinge in the middle of the frame and break whilst I'm cycling, perhaps in heavy traffic, at some point in the future. How do I determine who is a qualified repairer? If it is beyond repair can the insurer just offer the depreciated value? I would not want a second-hand folding bike just because I wouldn't know the history - it too could have had collision damage. I realise the insurers job is to pay as little as possible, but as you will know if you've been knocked off your bike, (first time ever for me), it's not just the injury, pain and inconvenience, but the psychological challenge of getting back on.
 
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Marli

New Member
Thank you. Yes, I contacted the UK company, (the bike was purchased abroad), but the people they referred me to, who don't advertise themselves as bike repairers, said they have been overwhelmed with work and are not taking anymore on. Other repairers either will not touch the bike because they cannot guarantee the integrity of the frame or are unable to tell me how they would test it. If the insurance company refuse to pay for a new frame/bike we will have to settle the matter in court, which is stupid, as their court costs will be more expensive.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
You shouldn't be doing all this running around. Its the duty of the insurers restore you to the position you enjoyed prior to their client wiping you out, and to further compensate youmfor any pain, distress, recovery time etc. It's their job to restore you to that position, notmyours to do it for them.

Tell them to get it repaired at a proper authorised workshop (its a fairly niche bike so you'd be quite correct to insist it went to a properly qualified establishment) or else provide you with a new one, or the wherewithall to buy a new one. Simples.

If they arent doing all this legwork then invoice them for your time in doing so yourself, which you're quite entitled to do.
 
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Marli

New Member
Thank you. It has crossed my mind that I'm the one spending time finding a repairer, but I thought better me than the insurance company who wouldn't care whether the bike was repaired by a reputable company as long as the cost was as low as possible. My future health and safety is not their concern.
 
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Marli

New Member
Seemingly, since I am unable to get the bike repaired the insurance company has written it off. Although I accept that the bike is 4 years old, it still have 9 months of warranty on it, voided by this accident. As I cannot produce the receipt - it was years ago - they will only offer me less than half the cost of the original cost and a similar amount for the clothing that was damaged (they do not mention any compensation for the injury I suffered). Cannot tell you how annoyed I am. I wouldn't buy a second-hand foldable bike solely because I wouldn't want to run the risk of not knowing its history (foldable bikes weakest point is the hinge) and past damage. I don't see why I should have to fork out extra for a new bike when I was very happy with my old bike and am only in this position because of the policy holder's failure to drive safely. I'm going to speak to a solicitor. If anyone has any good advice, I'd be happy to hear it.
 

boydj

Guru
Location
Paisley
Seemingly, since I am unable to get the bike repaired the insurance company has written it off. Although I accept that the bike is 4 years old, it still have 9 months of warranty on it, voided by this accident. As I cannot produce the receipt - it was years ago - they will only offer me less than half the cost of the original cost and a similar amount for the clothing that was damaged (they do not mention any compensation for the injury I suffered). Cannot tell you how annoyed I am. I wouldn't buy a second-hand foldable bike solely because I wouldn't want to run the risk of not knowing its history (foldable bikes weakest point is the hinge) and past damage. I don't see why I should have to fork out extra for a new bike when I was very happy with my old bike and am only in this position because of the policy holder's failure to drive safely. I'm going to speak to a solicitor. If anyone has any good advice, I'd be happy to hear it.
Reject their offer as totally inadequate. Time to get a cycling lawyer involved - or at least threaten them with one. You should be compensated for your injuries and all damages to your bike and clothing, with an element for your fear and distress and any additional travel costs due to not being able to use your bike. Work out what you consider reasonable, add some negotiating room and make them an offer, advising that you will be taking legal advice if they don't improve their offer substantially. Insurance companies will play this game, but they know that the involvement of lawyers will substantially increase their costs and won't fight too hard as long as the claim is reasonable.

While it's normal for the replacement of damaged equipment to be based on the current value, the other elements of the compensation should make up for that. In the meantime, check out specialist cycling lawyers. If you are a member of Cycling UK, or British Cycling, they'll be able to help. Or you may have legal cover through your house insurance.
 
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Marli

New Member
Thank you. I have rejected the offer and have contacted a solicitor. As there is no dispute as to fault, it's just a matter of compensation. I really cannot accept that it is fair and reasonable to pay a depreciated value on a bicycle in an accident that was not your fault. If I accepted their offer I would still have to find a further 450 to buy a replacement - something that I would never had to do and had no intention of doing for several years. If my helmet had been damaged, would they expect me to buy a second-hand one? The fight goes on.
 

themosquitoking

Veteran
Location
Spain
Thank you. I have rejected the offer and have contacted a solicitor. As there is no dispute as to fault, it's just a matter of compensation. I really cannot accept that it is fair and reasonable to pay a depreciated value on a bicycle in an accident that was not your fault. If I accepted their offer I would still have to find a further 450 to buy a replacement - something that I would never had to do and had no intention of doing for several years. If my helmet had been damaged, would they expect me to buy a second-hand one? The fight goes on.
Don't back down, the liability is totally theirs and not yours
 

carvelos

Regular
Location
IOW
Hi I know it is the insurance issue which is your focus but if you want a really decent company who fully 'gets' folding bikes I would suggest https://foldingbike.biz/ - they are called CH White and are in Malmesbury in Wiltshire - I have boughts loads there and they do all the Tern / Dahon buids and repairs you could shake a track pump at
 
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Marli

New Member
Hi I know it is the insurance issue which is your focus but if you want a really decent company who fully 'gets' folding bikes I would suggest https://foldingbike.biz/ - they are called CH White and are in Malmesbury in Wiltshire - I have boughts loads there and they do all the Tern / Dahon buids and repairs you could shake a track pump at
Well, in fact, I already emailed them a few weeks ago to to ask about wheels/tyres and disappointingly got no response.
 
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