recumbent trikes and charity rides

jeffoi

Active Member
Apologies if this has been asked before...

Has anyone done any organised charity rides on their recumbent trikes? Had any issues?

I mean I reckon that the organised transport from the finish line back would not take my trike, but I think I can convince my OH to come and get me in a hired vehicle of some sort.

I'm thinking of doing the Manchester to Blackpool in July next year...
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
I've done a couple on my old QNT. As transport wasn't a factor I can't comment on that, but an email, with a photo of your ride, should get a response from the organisers.
 
Apologies if this has been asked before...

Has anyone done any organised charity rides on their recumbent trikes? Had any issues?

I mean I reckon that the organised transport from the finish line back would not take my trike, but I think I can convince my OH to come and get me in a hired vehicle of some sort.

I'm thinking of doing the Manchester to Blackpool in July next year...
26C1888E-3C2E-415F-BC8D-B0205BD7D1FA.jpeg


This is me and a guy with Cerebral Atrophy, called Steve Walford. He did the PRLS last year on his ice trike, for Scope. He stayed in Ilford before the ride, and is from Wales. There were plenty of people willing to give him the assistance he required to get the Trike in and out of his car, many were just random people who happened to spot him, I reckon you’ll be fine getting any help you require, as trikes tend to be noticed more by people, and they seem more willing to help.
 

Tigerbiten

Veteran
I've done a few.

Most people don't think about the speed range that is common on a recumbent trike.
You'll find that you are/can be a lot slower uphill but a lot faster downhill.
So anything you can stay with going uphill, you'll leave for dead going down and vica versa.
Places like the bottom of a steep dip where you can go from +30 mph to sub-5 mph in a few yards can be interesting.
Also your brakes can/will stop you faster.
But so as long as you're aware of what's going on around you, you'll be fine.

Luck ........... ^_^
 

Tigerbiten

Veteran
If you are riding within a group of 'cars' you get a very restricted view of the road ahead.
Fixed ........... :laugh:

I don't think bikes block that much of my vision ahead as I tend to position myself slightly to one side so I can see past the one in-front of me.
I also found it's not so much on how restricted your vision gets, it's more of a fact on how badly you can get blocked in from dodging potholes.
Again it's down to reading the road and planning ahead.
 
OP
jeffoi

jeffoi

Active Member
Fixed ........... :laugh:

I don't think bikes block that much of my vision ahead as I tend to position myself slightly to one side so I can see past the one in-front of me.
I also found it's not so much on how restricted your vision gets, it's more of a fact on how badly you can get blocked in from dodging potholes.
Again it's down to reading the road and planning ahead.
I'm currently riding to work on unlit roads in the dark for part of the way. Seeing the potholes to avoid them is difficult, but doable. Just have to go slower when the visibility is low.

But it's worth bearing in mind, thank you

Edited to add: I do have a good light, but it's attached to the boss on the boom and the roads are curvy
 
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Tigerbiten

Veteran
It doesn't help that a bent trikes are set so low but I've found two front lights works well.
Left hand slightly towards the gutter and down a little to illuminate the pot holes there.
Right hand one slightly out and just below the horizontal to throw the light further out.
Doing that gives you both a wider and longer light cone.

Helmet lights work.

Another trick is to mount a light on the back of the seat so it shines over your shoulder/head.
If you position it so it doesn't blind you then the higher mounting point gives you a much broader light patch on the road.

Luck ........... ^_^
 

Nigelnightmare

Senior Member
I've found it best to contact the ride organiser's, telling them what type of "Bike/Trike" you're riding to find out if their transport caters for it.
Most are very interested and will go out of their way to help.
 

Tilley

Senior Member
Location
Bristol
On the issue of lights you need 2 lights preferably at different heights to get any defined stereoscopic vision. Headlights are good but in foggy conditions they can be just like the full beam on a car resulting in a white out.
 
OP
jeffoi

jeffoi

Active Member
On the issue of lights you need 2 lights preferably at different heights to get any defined stereoscopic vision. Headlights are good but in foggy conditions they can be just like the full beam on a car resulting in a white out.
I see what you mean about fog, but otherwise stereoscopic vision is not an issue for me anyway. I have only one working eye, so I can't see in 3D. I'm learning the route a bit now, know where the worst holes are. And tbh, I just ride more slowly on the unlit roads.
 
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jeffoi

jeffoi

Active Member
So the Manchester to Blackpool is the ride I've signed up for.

It's getting jolly close.

Went out yesterday with the 'upright cyclist' that I'll be riding with for a 40 mile practise ride and surprisingly my legs are fine today. I just need to figure out keeping myself hydrated and... Er... Energised?

Anyone else riding the Manchester to Blackpool this July?
 
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jeffoi

jeffoi

Active Member
The big (for me) ride was today. I managed to gety chain to fall off about half way there, it got caught between the small chain ring and the chain guard. I had to loosen the chain guard to get it back out. :/

But other than that it went quite well and wasn't as hard as I had been fearing. We did take it easy (about 7 hours including rest stops and mechanical issue).

If anyone would like to sponsor me (and I'm very cheeky to ask, I know) pop over to just giving and search for jeffoi. You'll find me :smile:

We had a lovely day for it, if a tad on the warm side. A bit more cloud cover would have been appreciated by me at least.
 
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