People calling non-recumbent bikes 'upwrongs'

OP
Hilldodger

Hilldodger

Über Member
Location
sunny Leicester
One of mine, yes.:smile:

An essential part of my job as a professional penny-farthing rider:thumbsup:
 
OP
Hilldodger

Hilldodger

Über Member
Location
sunny Leicester
I ride my penny to a standstill and then ride off agin in complete control and do much longer track stands than on a boys...er..small bike.

So perhaps I do find it easier to balance a mans bike
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
That confirms what I've been told about the old Wheelmen's opposition to the new fangled Safety.
The same thing now being said about 'bent bikes!
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Exactly!

On the other hand it's better to fall off something really low!

Plus the lower the 'bent the less likely you are to come a cropper, something the old wheelmen did quite often by all accounts. Hence the CTC inventing roadsigns to warn cyclists to dismount on steep down hill sections to avoid going over the handlebars!
 

arallsopp

Post of The Year 2009 winner
Location
Bromley, Kent
Fell off the SMGTe for the first time last night. Thames Path in the rain, heading West along the south side of the river, between the Thames Barrier and Greenwich. Its all blind corners and naff surfaces, then suddenly its a big steel disc right on a corner, taking 90% of the path, and about 3 metres across.

Clipped in, turning, braking, leaning becomes unexpectedly laying on my side. On a DF, that'd be a very hurty wrist at least. I landed on my elbow which had I been upright would probably be extremely sore today. Instead I have a tiny little bump. Enough to say "Yes. I've fallen off it" but not enough to discourage me riding another 20 miles recreationally that night.

Eventually, it was the weather that did us in. No where to tuck your head out the path of freezing rain on an unfaired bent. ;)
 
Location
EDINBURGH
arallsopp said:
Fell off the SMGTe for the first time last night. Thames Path in the rain, heading West along the south side of the river, between the Thames Barrier and Greenwich. Its all blind corners and naff surfaces, then suddenly its a big steel disc right on a corner, taking 90% of the path, and about 3 metres across.

Clipped in, turning, braking, leaning becomes unexpectedly laying on my side. On a DF, that'd be a very hurty wrist at least. I landed on my elbow which had I been upright would probably be extremely sore today. Instead I have a tiny little bump. Enough to say "Yes. I've fallen off it" but not enough to discourage me riding another 20 miles recreationally that night.

Eventually, it was the weather that did us in. No where to tuck your head out the path of freezing rain on an unfaired bent. ;)
That would be a little slide and a grin on a trike.
 

arallsopp

Post of The Year 2009 winner
Location
Bromley, Kent
Catrike UK said:
That would be a little slide and a grin on a trike.
That's what it was on the SMGTe.
But I got a free of charge bump on the elbow too.
Don't feel you're missing out though.
I can always give you yours on the bentkentride. ;)
 

Fiona N

Veteran
arallsopp said:
Fell off the SMGTe for the first time last night.

:smile:
I'm impressed - but maybe you're not trying hard enough - as I've fallen off the SpM nearly every time I've ridden it ;) Mainly while stationary but wet leaves on the corners of country lanes have been a bit of a bugger recently.

BTW, while I understand those old bikes with huge front wheels are easier to balance once you get the knack of getting on, they do seem to be reluctant to go up hill. I passed a bloke walking beside one on a gentle (compared to many in the area) incline somewhere between Leeds and Skipton. I was towards the end of a long day's touring on the SpM - with panniers and whatnot - but still sped past. Made me wonder about the bloke that tours on them - does he push up every hill too?
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Fiona N said:
I'm impressed - but maybe you're not trying hard enough - as I've fallen off the SpM nearly every time I've ridden it ;) Mainly while stationary but wet leaves on the corners of country lanes have been a bit of a bugger recently.

BTW, while I understand those old bikes with huge front wheels are easier to balance once you get the knack of getting on, they do seem to be reluctant to go up hill. I passed a bloke walking beside one on a gentle (compared to many in the area) incline somewhere between Leeds and Skipton. I was towards the end of a long day's touring on the SpM - with panniers and whatnot - but still sped past. Made me wonder about the bloke that tours on them - does he push up every hill too?
On a fixed gear, typically 54" or so IIRC, the problem on hills is easy to understand.
It was the downhills which were dangerous, on unsealed surfaces and with the weight almost all on the front wheel a stone infront of the wheel sends the rider over the top. Which is why CTC started to label dangerous hills!
 
OP
Hilldodger

Hilldodger

Über Member
Location
sunny Leicester
byegad said:
On a fixed gear, typically 54" or so IIRC, the problem on hills is easy to understand.
It was the downhills which were dangerous, on unsealed surfaces and with the weight almost all on the front wheel a stone infront of the wheel sends the rider over the top. Which is why CTC started to label dangerous hills!
It's more to do with the bike running away from you and not being able to stop it than rough roads - with such a big wheel you can ride of some very big potholes!
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Possibly,although I have a 1978 edition of Richards Bicycle book with some old line drawings. One shows some 'young bloods' descending a steep hill with their legs over the handle bars. I assume to a) get their feet out of the way of the pedals and ;) so if they do go over the top they can attempt to land feet first!

Rather them than me!
 

arallsopp

Post of The Year 2009 winner
Location
Bromley, Kent
Fiona N said:
I'm impressed - but maybe you're not trying hard enough - as I've fallen off the SpM nearly every time I've ridden it ;) Mainly while stationary but wet leaves on the corners of country lanes have been a bit of a bugger recently.
Thank you Fiona. I am marking your comments for the attention of my cycling buddy who spent much of last night teasing me about my fear of leaves.

Falling off stationary takes some going. I've only attempted that once, using a right turn from a T junction with unexpected traffic arriving across my path. Managed to get out of the pedals in time, but put a cleated sole onto a near frictionless surface and only managed to keep the bike upright by sacrificing every muscle on the inside of my thigh.
Ouch. Couldn't fall off as was in sight of a bus stop of kids. :smile:
 
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