On the oche

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
The second fella she beat is a very good player, though he does have days when he can't hit a double to save his life.

I don't think she has the quality to beat the very best men, but she is raising the profile of the sport for other women, which might mean that the womens game gets more prize money so more can afford to get involved and dedicate the time to get as good as the men.
....and then hopefully we’ll just have one game where men and women compete on equal terms for equal prize money?
 

Supersuperleeds

Legendary Member
Location
Leicester
....and then hopefully we’ll just have one game where men and women compete on equal terms for equal prize money?
Hopefully.
 

Beebo

Firm and Fruity
Location
Hexleybeef
Erm... Showjumping, three day eventing and dressage for starters... :rolleyes:
National hunt and flat racing all have successful female jockeys.
In theory F1 is a unisex sport.
But no women have broken into the top tier yet.
It can’t be long.
Ultra marathon sports already appear to benefit female athletes. Which is a good thing.
 
All motorsport is a unisex sport (if you ignore the 'W' series, that is). There's been recent female champions in the British GT championship - Jamie Chadwick in GT4 and Flick Haigh in GT3.
I grew up watching Michelle Mouton Louise Aitken-Walker and Fabrizia Pons (rallying), plus Paula Cook and Nettan Lindgren (single seaters & touring cars), and then later, when I was down on the fenceline with the cameras, Kelly-Jayne Wells was a pretty effective operator in a pickup truck, plus of course Susie Stoddart (now Wolf)
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
Another nail in the "man" coffin :sad:
Awww bubs. :rolleyes:

Could you clarify what the "man coffin" actually is though..

It's bringing up some 'interesting' images for me :blink:
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
Exactly...so why hasn't it happened until now?
Well here's a few possibilities.

Women weren't interested enough to practice hard enough to get that good at chucking arrers.

Or those who were interested were put off by the overall blokey atmos, disparaging comments from others, or very possibly genuinely not having enough time, confidence, or resources to practice more.

As a woman (yes I know crazy stuff huh:blink:) I've often had folks suggest - either explicitly or otherwise - that what I'm putting my time and energy into, isn't quite appropriate for my gender.

But being an awkward cuss, I ignored them, and got on with it, however the undercurrent of
"This stuff isn't for you" was still very much there.

I still hear the same from younger women entering occupations / leisure activities, which are non trad female.

You still get dumb@rses on the internet suggesting stuff like 'go make me a sandwich' - threatened or what??

And the images, and advertising still reflect many biases.

It's wearying having to resist all that invisible tide of negativity - esp when it's combined with our own self doubts when starting out - which are common enough to all humans of course.

The more females seen doing all these things, the more that becomes perfectly normal, unremarkable even.
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Well here's a few possibilities.

Women weren't interested enough to practice hard enough to get that good at chucking arrers.

Or those who were interested were put off by the overall blokey atmos, disparaging comments from others, or very possibly genuinely not having enough time, confidence, or resources to practice more.

As a woman (yes I know crazy stuff huh:blink:) I've often had folks suggest - either explicitly or otherwise - that what I'm putting my time and energy into, isn't quite appropriate for my gender.

But being an awkward cuss, I ignored them, and got on with it, however the undercurrent of
"This stuff isn't for you" was still very much there.

I still hear the same from younger women entering occupations / leisure activities, which are non trad female.

You still get dumb@rses on the internet suggesting stuff like 'go make me a sandwich' - threatened or what??

And the images, and advertising still reflect many biases.

It's wearying having to resist all that invisible tide of negativity - esp when it's combined with our own self doubts when starting out - which are common enough to all humans of course.

The more females seen doing all these things, the more that becomes perfectly normal, unremarkable even.
Thanks (it was a rhetorical question to Accy)!
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
Well here's a few possibilities.

Women weren't interested enough to practice hard enough to get that good at chucking arrers.

Or those who were interested were put off by the overall blokey atmos, disparaging comments from others, or very possibly genuinely not having enough time, confidence, or resources to practice more.

As a woman (yes I know crazy stuff huh:blink:) I've often had folks suggest - either explicitly or otherwise - that what I'm putting my time and energy into, isn't quite appropriate for my gender.

But being an awkward cuss, I ignored them, and got on with it, however the undercurrent of
"This stuff isn't for you" was still very much there.

I still hear the same from younger women entering occupations / leisure activities, which are non trad female.

You still get dumb@rses on the internet suggesting stuff like 'go make me a sandwich' - threatened or what??

And the images, and advertising still reflect many biases.

It's wearying having to resist all that invisible tide of negativity - esp when it's combined with our own self doubts when starting out - which are common enough to all humans of course.

The more females seen doing all these things, the more that becomes perfectly normal, unremarkable even.

I always thought you were a bloke..
I'll treat you as a lady in future ;)
 
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