Now this is what i'd call "Adventure Cycling" --- Biking in West Africa.

mudsticks

Veteran
I cycled from Cairo to Dar-es-Salaam in 1984, spent 3 months doing it, I had planned on going further south but had run out of time, what with weather, road conditions and paperwork I just kept getting bogged down. but it was and interesting trip, and I am glad i did it.
 
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mudsticks

mudsticks

Veteran
I cycled from Cairo to Dar-es-Salaam in 1984, spent 3 months doing it, I had planned on going further south but had run out of time, what with weather, road conditions and paperwork I just kept getting bogged down. but it was and interesting trip, and I am glad i did it.
That sounds very 'character building' not least to make you appreciate well made roads.

What sort of bike did you do it on?

Camping, or guest houses?
 
That sounds very 'character building' not least to make you appreciate well made roads.

What sort of bike did you do it on?

Camping, or guest houses?
I used a Revell Romany Touring bike, though I carried lightwieght camping gear, I mainly stayed in guest Houses, well most where far from what you might think as being a guest House, what with bugs and lack of toilet facilities, I also stayed in Churches and peoples houses. You quickly get into the lack of road sense that happens on the roads. Sometimes you do not know wheather to laugh or cry.
 
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mudsticks

mudsticks

Veteran
I used a Revell Romany Touring bike, though I carried lightwieght camping gear, I mainly stayed in guest Houses, well most where far from what you might think as being a guest House, what with bugs and lack of toilet facilities, I also stayed in Churches and peoples houses. You quickly get into the lack of road sense that happens on the roads. Sometimes you do not know wheather to laugh or cry.
Sounds fascinating.

Of course its not always the case, but it often seems to be, that the warmth of welcome is often greatest, from those who already have the least.

Maybe its something to do with understanding the precarious nature of existence, when its not so well insulated by material wealth.

PBG seems to use a self supported mesh inner tent, even when sleeping indoors - i guess it gives a modicum of privacy, and of course protection from bugs.

I like a solid shelter myself too - i'm all into viewing the sky at night etc etc - but its nice to have the option of being contained as well.

How many miles ( very roughly) a day did you manage to make ??
 
Sounds fascinating.

Of course its not always the case, but it often seems to be, that the warmth of welcome is often greatest, from those who already have the least.

Maybe its something to do with understanding the precarious nature of existence, when its not so well insulated by material wealth.

PBG seems to use a self supported mesh inner tent, even when sleeping indoors - i guess it gives a modicum of privacy, and of course protection from bugs.

I like a solid shelter myself too - i'm all into viewing the sky at night etc etc - but its nice to have the option of being contained as well.

How many miles ( very roughly) a day did you manage to make ??
The overall distance was about 4000 miles give or take a couple hundred miles, some days when the roads were good 80 odd miles other days maybe 30 miles avarage I think was 47 miles, back then I did not have the tech stuff to track what I was doing just paper maps., crossing the Nubian desert I guess was the most toublesome as my bottom bracket decided to fall apart so had to waste time fixing that in the midde of nowhere. other than that I had no other mechinal problems. nor did I get suffer any tummy problem which is prevalant.
 
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