New chain clicking

OP
J

Jamzo7

New Member
What do you mean "it clicks all the way round"? How many clicks per rotation of the cranks?

As in every time a chain link leaves the tooth if that makes sense.

It's like the gears are not indexed properly or the chain line is out a bit across the whole of the cassette.
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
As in every time a chain link leaves the tooth if that makes sense.
It's like the gears are not indexed properly or the chain line is out a bit across the whole of the cassette.
No further suggestions, your honour. Put the old chain back on, and run it till it skips - which will probably be a long time. The chain and cassette will wear together.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Ive rarely had a drive train problem that with careful observation I could spot the issues on the stand. They may not be as pronounced but still present themselves visually or audibly.
 

Shearwater Missile

Senior Member
Location
Stowmarket
Probably not but you're not mis-feeding the new chain through the dérailleur and going the wrong way over the tab through the jockey wheels?
I did this by accident but knew something was wrong before I took the bike out. If it was OK before changing the chain and if the new chain is OK it must be something you have done. It would be too much of a coincidence for alignment to go out. Had you been having problems with the old chain beforehand ? Anyway, I hope that you have sorted it out now.
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
Possibly worn smaller chain ring . . .
Could be - and shown up by the new chain. In the OP it's unclear as to what has done "2k km" - the bike; the chain?
New chain on old chainrings . . . is usually not a good idea.
:welcome: back to CycleChat after the summer off. BS. New chain on old chainrings . . . is normal. Depending on use, I'd expect at least 20,000km out of a chainring - that's a lot of new chains.
Do you replace your chainrings every time you replace a chain?!
 
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Yes. But then I mostly ride mountain bikes and run drive trains until they're completely worn out. I used to do the whole measuring chain wear thing, and change chains regularly, but unless you changed the chain after a few hundred miles, it would just skip/suck, and you had to change everything anyway.
It works out more economic to run everything until its worn (current drive train on my main mtb is upto around 1200miles and is extremely worn but still functioning reasonably well) than risk changing the chain only, and have to replace everything long before then.
Off course, road bikes last far longer and usually still have more than one chainring, so depending on use, you might not have to replace both chainrings, but the same principles apply.

Regardless, if you look at the OP's photos, the small ring is obviously worn. I'd guess the new chain rollers are catching every tooth producing the clicking.
You might get away with just running in the bigger ring to wear the chain a bit, but certainly a new little ring would be my preferred option.
 

silva

Active Member
Location
Belgium
That's what I thought>said too. Wear difference old new, the valleys between the teeth of the sprocket became wider so that the links of a new chain, having the default/new distance of 1/2", have more room avail and under tension they shift backwards to hit trailing edges of the sprockets teeth, being that "clicking".
 
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