ICE mesh seat repair with SeamGrip (urethane glue) ?

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Has anyone had experience of using the "McNett/GearAid SeamGrip seam sealer and outdoor repair adhesive" to repair frayed and broken threads on an ICE mesh seat ? My aim is to stop the frayed threads from unravelling any further.

Their description - " ...urethane rubber adhesive provides a clear,strong and flexible finish suitable for permanent waterpoof repairs to holes, tears or leaking seams in most types of camping or outdoor equipment".

I'm moving the old seat frame and fabric from an ICE Q (d.o.b. circa 06 to 09, so not the current "soft" mesh that ICE use now), to my Kettwiesel rebuild. I had read that others have successfully cleaned the mesh fabric by putting in the washing machine. I did the same last weekend, and can confirm it worked for me too - the seat mesh hasn't shrunk, or gone loose, and the wash has removed much dirt and grime.

Before washing, I noticed several frayed threads in the weave, so there was a risk the washing could make this worse. Thankfully not. The threads I want to bond together are now clean, and likely to stick better to each other with the right glue. I

I'll give this a try tomorrow - but it'd be interesting to hear if anyone else has had to repair their seat mesh, and how successful it was ?
 

alicat

Legendary Member
Location
Staffs
Just a couple of other ideas - if it's not an area that you directly sit on or would rub, is it worth melting some threads together with a match? Or using some sugru?

Caveat, I haven't seen the mesh in question so it could be a crap idea.
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
OK, here are some photos of where I have tried out the seam grip.

Before and after on the ICE seat. Edges (fabric frayed, lots of fluffy fibres)

Frayed fabric before seamgrip.jpg


Frayed fabric after seamgrip.jpg



and mesh strands (broken and loose).

Mesh before seamgrip.jpg


Mesh after seamgrip.jpg



I also tried it on the edges of nylon fabric (close mesh, plastic backed) cut out of the base of a rack bag (the cut out lets me slip the bag over an HL-type ebike battery, fitted to the rear rack of a 2 wheeler. The aim here was to stop the fabric from ripping further at the cut lines (it's not a "rip stop" material, and once cut, I found it tore relatively easily).

Edge of rack bag cutout after seamgrip.jpg




12 hours after application, it's no longer a sticky liquid (now it's a sticky, rubbery consistency). Very sticky, still, a bit like contact adhesive. I read somewhere that dusting with talcum powder may be needed to prevent the surface from sticking to any other material. I'll wait 24 hours for it to cure completely.

N.B. In future I'll be careful to apply only to surfaces when horizontal - this morning I found one area where the glue had pooled, then run. It's very difficult to remove once set.

Initial impression is that it is flexible, will do the job of holding loose strands in place. I'll experiment with diluting it before application, with expectation it may not "film" between strands on the seat mesh.
 

Nigelnightmare

Senior Member
It looks like it worked OK on the seat edge & mesh.
Try poking through the filmed over bits after it's set with an awl or other pointy thing, for example a square needle file with a piece of cork or foam rubber behind it.
 
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OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Try poking through the filmed over bits after it's set with an awl or other pointy thing, for example a square needle file with a piece of cork or foam rubber behind it.
One week on, the glue is well and truly "cured". No remaining stickiness - it feels rubbery ! The patch stretches as you pull on it in different directions, but none of the separated threads come away. I'd claim this as a result.

I did try sticking a pointed hand-tool into the filmed-over bits between the original mesh strands. It is pretty resilient to letting the point through, and didn't make the appearance any better. Having tried several sections, I stopped. I'm happy with the test section, so will go on and do the other areas - there are several on the sides, where the mesh and fabric wrap around the frame. The shine might dull over time, we'll see.
 
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OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Certainly, avoid the heat method suggested for polyester fibres - what you've imaged is an area that is some form of flexible "rubber" that has deteriorated. Heat would just burn the material, damaging it further.

Looking at the recent ICE seat covering (like the one you have pictured), I notice that the main seat mesh and the securing straps are not one continuous fabric (looking at the reverse). The two areas of woven mesh are joined by a flexible rubber material, which gets sown onto the mesh parts. Putting a film of urethane glue straight onto/under that "may" stop further deterioration. You could try that first.

My experience with the urethane glue is that it does adhere to most clean surfaces, and it does bind loose threads. The instructions make it clear that it will not adhere to silicone-coated areas (there is a silicone glue from the same manufacturer), so clean the area well first (isopropyl alcohol).

In your photo - is the area frayed ? Is there a "mesh" or thread showing through the cracks ? Or is it just cracked rubber, with nothing between the cracks ?

If just rubber, then I'd suggest you do a two stage repair. Two patches of "cordura" type fabric, glued underneath.

(Heavy Duty Thick Waterproof Canvas Fabric Material Outdoor Cover Cordura Type, 99p delivered) https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382314842080

a) urethane glue + smaller cordura patch directly onto the reverse of what you have pictured, cut to size, between the two mesh areas (to level the area out)
b) urethane glue + larger cordura patch to overlap the first patch, and areas either side (now glued over the mesh sections behind the rubber).

If you did it on the reverse, and you cut the fabric to size, it would hardly be visible. And to allow for the curvature of the fabric, remove the seat cover and glue the patches into place with the seat cover in its "usual" position - don't stretch the area flat if it is normally curved.

Do it in two stages, 24 hours between application, to let the urethane glue cure. And lightly chalk/talc the area before putting it back on the frame.
 
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plantfit

Veteran
Location
Lincolnshire
Many thanks for your reply,there is no mash or thread showing through the cracks so going to try the Cordura patch and Urethane glue, once again thanks for the suggestions
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Ice can supply replacement covers. Not the cheapest solution, but possible for you???

I managed to drop a heavy metal box onto my QNT seat, neatly punching a hole in the back support area. I darned the area with black wool which provided a temporary repair that lasted 9 yrs, when I sold the trike. As far as I know, four years after the sale it's still good.
 

plantfit

Veteran
Location
Lincolnshire
I bought this new soft mesh seat from ICE two years ago,thought it would have lasted a bit longer than it has and at £130 you're right not the cheapest solution, my new sheets of Cordura type material have arrived so will try that first before splashing out anymore cash,thanks for the suggestions though
 
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