I can't do lightweight cycling

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
I had been meaning to take my refurbished BSA on a proper ride for a while now but I hadn't got 'round to it for one reason or another. I did about 60 miles on it today.

There are no loops for my saddle bag on the saddle. There is no rack to store things. There are no bottle cage mounts on the frame. I dug out a bar mounted bottle cage (as was probably normal when the bike was new) so that gave me somewhere to put a water bottle. I squeezed a puncture repair kit and a multi-tool and my phone in a small saddle pack. The bike has the original frame pump and it works. I was riding in civies - shorts and t-shirt so had no jersey pockets.

I had to hand over my hard-earned cash for some over-priced pre-packaged sandwiches which tasted like cardboard. I was left afterwards with a pocket full of change. I was caught out by an unexpected heavy shower but had no jacket.

Normally I would have had my ever-present Carradice saddle bag on a ride like this. I would have had somewhere to put sandwiches and snacks so could have had nicer food for my ride, I could have had a spare bottle of water instead of having to ration it (it was hot and sticky). I would have had a waterproof jacket stuffed in the bottom of my saddle bag so I wouldn't have got soaked. I would normally have had proper mudguards so my feet wouldn't have been completely soaked by water flung up by the front wheel.

People ask me why I carry so much stuff with me when cycling but to me it makes perfect sense and for me makes cycling a more enjoyable experience to have all the supplies I am likely to need. I guess everyone is different.

I'm pleased with the bike and it rides great. I was concerned I might struggle on my planned route with a 42/24 bottom gear but in reality I didn't even need to get out of the saddle. It is such a nice period piece and has clearly seen little use and probably has all original components apart from the tyres (I should really bin the brake pads as they're so hard they're like lumps of wood and not much good at actually stopping the bike) but I am tempted to stuff originality and stick a rack and some proper mudguards on it and fit some saddle bag loops (or a Brooks saddle:becool:) so I can carry the kitchen sink with me.

I'm in no hurry and not chasing PBs, for me cycling is more enjoyable when I'm properly prepared for the road and fully self-sufficient. I know I'm going against modern thinking but surely I'm not the only one.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
There's clips available that allow the fitting of a saddle bag. They fasten onto the saddle rails.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
I had been meaning to take my refurbished BSA on a proper ride for a while now but I hadn't got 'round to it for one reason or another. I did about 60 miles on it today.

There are no loops for my saddle bag on the saddle. There is no rack to store things. There are no bottle cage mounts on the frame. I dug out a bar mounted bottle cage (as was probably normal when the bike was new) so that gave me somewhere to put a water bottle. I squeezed a puncture repair kit and a multi-tool and my phone in a small saddle pack. The bike has the original frame pump and it works. I was riding in civies - shorts and t-shirt so had no jersey pockets.

I had to hand over my hard-earned cash for some over-priced pre-packaged sandwiches which tasted like cardboard. I was left afterwards with a pocket full of change. I was caught out by an unexpected heavy shower but had no jacket.

Normally I would have had my ever-present Carradice saddle bag on a ride like this. I would have had somewhere to put sandwiches and snacks so could have had nicer food for my ride, I could have had a spare bottle of water instead of having to ration it (it was hot and sticky). I would have had a waterproof jacket stuffed in the bottom of my saddle bag so I wouldn't have got soaked. I would normally have had proper mudguards so my feet wouldn't have been completely soaked by water flung up by the front wheel.

People ask me why I carry so much stuff with me when cycling but to me it makes perfect sense and for me makes cycling a more enjoyable experience to have all the supplies I am likely to need. I guess everyone is different.

I'm pleased with the bike and it rides great. I was concerned I might struggle on my planned route with a 42/24 bottom gear but in reality I didn't even need to get out of the saddle. It is such a nice period piece and has clearly seen little use and probably has all original components apart from the tyres (I should really bin the brake pads as they're so hard they're like lumps of wood and not much good at actually stopping the bike) but I am tempted to stuff originality and stick a rack and some proper mudguards on it and fit some saddle bag loops (or a Brooks saddle:becool:) so I can carry the kitchen sink with me.

I'm in no hurry and not chasing PBs, for me cycling is more enjoyable when I'm properly prepared for the road and fully self-sufficient. I know I'm going against modern thinking but surely I'm not the only one.
get a Brooks, you know you want to,

these look good,
https://pulsar.ebay.co.uk/plsr/clk/0/SADS/9?pld={"mecs":"264807605898a02ecef048ae4a77900099828716b0ab","ampid":"PL_CLK","enc":"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"}
 

snorri

Legendary Member
I'm in no hurry and not chasing PBs, for me cycling is more enjoyable when I'm properly prepared for the road and fully self-sufficient. I know I'm going against modern thinking but surely I'm not the only one.
I never leave home without a pair of rear panniers even although they may only carry a puncture repair kit between them, so you are not alone:smile:.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Prize for the longest linky i've ever seen, mind unless you click it you'll never see the 'bargain' :laugh:
 

HMS_Dave

Über Member
Location
Midlands
Vintage is one word to describe them, its not a word i would use to describe them mind...
 

classic33

Legendary Member
Don't you like short links.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I like to at least have the basics; water bottle, roll of insulating tape, puncture kit and pump, but in nice fine weather I will sometimes choose to ride a rackless, mudguardless bike and take my chances with getting wet in a shower. I have the choice of two, one what @midlife describes as a demi course Dawes, and a more laid back Raleigh Royal tourer, which I have stripped of it's rack and guards as they were battered/rusty when I acquired the bike. Generally I will choose the Raleigh, because it has the most comfortable 531 frame I've yet encountered.
Although not super-light at 26 lbs stripped, the Royal is sprightly enough and better on gradients compared to a 40 lb 3-speed, and on a calm dry day the absence of having intrusive rattles and twangs from a rack and guards is very pleasant. I don't tend to go further than about 40 miles though, and don't usually feel any need to carry food with me, only water. I wear fairly loose fitting cargo shorts, which have hip and leg pockets to safely carry stuff like money and phone. My keys and a swiss penknife hang off the belt loops on a karabiner, so no problem with those.
I don't think either minimalist or maximalist cycling is necessarily better than the other. It depends on lots of factors like the planned mileage, terrain, how hot or dry the weather is etc. My most used bike is still my Raleigh Pioneer, which I weighed the other day @ 33 lbs with rack and mudguards. It represents a good compromise between a hefty utility bike and a light road bike, which is what it is, a halfway house. When deciding whether to go minimalist or not, I pay close attention to the weather forecast and weather radar maps. If it looks at all dodgy, I will choose a fully-equipped bike, either hybrid or 3-speed. If it looks really fine and clear, sometimes I will take a chance on the minimalist option.
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
I had been meaning to take my refurbished BSA on a proper ride for a while now but I hadn't got 'round to it for one reason or another. I did about 60 miles on it today.

There are no loops for my saddle bag on the saddle. There is no rack to store things. There are no bottle cage mounts on the frame. I dug out a bar mounted bottle cage (as was probably normal when the bike was new) so that gave me somewhere to put a water bottle. I squeezed a puncture repair kit and a multi-tool and my phone in a small saddle pack. The bike has the original frame pump and it works. I was riding in civies - shorts and t-shirt so had no jersey pockets.

I had to hand over my hard-earned cash for some over-priced pre-packaged sandwiches which tasted like cardboard. I was left afterwards with a pocket full of change. I was caught out by an unexpected heavy shower but had no jacket.

Normally I would have had my ever-present Carradice saddle bag on a ride like this. I would have had somewhere to put sandwiches and snacks so could have had nicer food for my ride, I could have had a spare bottle of water instead of having to ration it (it was hot and sticky). I would have had a waterproof jacket stuffed in the bottom of my saddle bag so I wouldn't have got soaked. I would normally have had proper mudguards so my feet wouldn't have been completely soaked by water flung up by the front wheel.

People ask me why I carry so much stuff with me when cycling but to me it makes perfect sense and for me makes cycling a more enjoyable experience to have all the supplies I am likely to need. I guess everyone is different.

I'm pleased with the bike and it rides great. I was concerned I might struggle on my planned route with a 42/24 bottom gear but in reality I didn't even need to get out of the saddle. It is such a nice period piece and has clearly seen little use and probably has all original components apart from the tyres (I should really bin the brake pads as they're so hard they're like lumps of wood and not much good at actually stopping the bike) but I am tempted to stuff originality and stick a rack and some proper mudguards on it and fit some saddle bag loops (or a Brooks saddle:becool:) so I can carry the kitchen sink with me.

I'm in no hurry and not chasing PBs, for me cycling is more enjoyable when I'm properly prepared for the road and fully self-sufficient. I know I'm going against modern thinking but surely I'm not the only one.
I’m with you brother...never knowingly under-prepared!

In my case, the size of the Carradice varies with distance!
 
Morning,

Personally I am a ride light, second bottle cage holds tools, tubes and puncture repair kit and I nearly always ride in a cycling top with lots of pockets.

but I am tempted to stuff originality and stick a rack and some proper mudguards on it
But I see absolutely no reason not to do this, I have tried rewriting the next sentence a few times and it stills read a bit harsher than I really want. :-)

If the BSA you are talking about is the one in your profile picture then it comes from the era where Raleigh painted the same bike as Raleighs, Carltons, BSAs etc, It wasn't targeted at enthusiasts but sold in general toy and bike retailers. I had something similar in 5 speed form, the Raleigh Shadow.

Many, many had racks added as most of these frames had mudguard eyes, as they didn't have quick release wheels there were also lot of racks sold that mounted over the rear wheel spindle.

Some models had bottle cages with clamps fitted onto the down tube and those that didn't often got them added and as the pump is under the top tube you could add a second bottle cage onto the seat tube.

You are probably lucky not to have the factory fitted bottle as they were made out of a rigid plastic and couldn't be squeezed.

The racing half-guards were cost savings made to appear as a go-faster upgrade, think 20 spoke wheels on £600 bikes sold to 16 stone new riders today.

Anyway the point of all this is that by not adding racks and bottles you are actually not doing what many people who bought the bike new would have done.

I also also glad that you find 42x24 a reasonable bottom gear, I often get looked at as a looney when suggesting such a thing.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
When riding loan roadbikes on day tours I usually improvise some kind of tool roll strapped the the saddle rails with toeclip straps. If a waterproof is too bulky to go there you can usually strap it separately to the sestpost or frame tube.
 
Top Bottom