HS2

Jenkins

Legendary Member
Location
Felixstowe
If the current 2 metre rule on social distancing carries on, with the reported effect of reducing passenger capacity on public transport, would it be worth revisiting the viability of HS2 as a way of saving public money?
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
If the current 2 metre rule on social distancing carries on, with the reported effect of reducing passenger capacity on public transport, would it be worth revisiting the viability of HS2 as a way of saving public money?
You really expect the 2m rule to still be in effect in 2029?
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Senior Member
No, but using the earliest planned date seemed reasonable for this question. If I'd written 2032, someone would have posted "ah do you mean HS2 isn't going to open in 2029 as planned" but I see I underestimated you.
It's not me it's the iron trust and reliability of the government(not even only the uk's goverment) setting deadlines.. and deadlines, and finally the grand opening when over 90% still does'nt work because they need to plugin the power for example. (Belgian Antwerpen Central Station underpass is an great example. the end result looked/looks pretty but it was a clusterf*ck of delays and they need special trains to run there because the tunnel is to steep for normal ones.)
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Tree is not only a tree. It is also a valuable part of ecosystem it supports. Old growth is known to be home to more species than new trees. Old trees sequester more carbon.
Old trees give more shade and are more pleasant to look atm
New trees turn into old trees soon enough, what we are suffering from is the lack of tree planting in the 60's and 70's. I was part of the tree planting change in the late 80's when I worked for a year at Watermead Park and personally planted around 80 saplings, a couple of hundred Hazel 'whips' and thousands of Hawthorn/Blackthorn whips along about 1/2 a mile of fencing I'd erected along the Canal bank.
Eventually Watermead will tie in to the new National Forest I believe.
 

Poacher

Gravitationally challenged member
Location
Nottingham
New trees turn into old trees soon enough, what we are suffering from is the lack of tree planting in the 60's and 70's. I was part of the tree planting change in the late 80's when I worked for a year at Watermead Park and personally planted around 80 saplings, a couple of hundred Hazel 'whips' and thousands of Hawthorn/Blackthorn whips along about 1/2 a mile of fencing I'd erected along the Canal bank.
Eventually Watermead will tie in to the new National Forest I believe.
There was a movement to plant trees in the 70s:
"Plant a tree in 73
Plant some more in 74
If they're still alive in 75
We'll chop some sticks in 76"
 

Badger_Boom

Well-Known Member
Location
York
Me too, they make excellent noise barriers I just hope they plant mixed woodland though and not a 'monoculture'.
A colleague once told me that to achieve the same reduction in sound level as one of those purpose built noise barrier fences would require a belt of plantation approximately 1km thick.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
A colleague once told me that to achieve the same reduction in sound level as one of those purpose built noise barrier fences would require a belt of plantation approximately 1km thick.
Great so some new Coppices planted in some areas and sound barriers in others, maybe the odd industrial estate backing onto it where they're needed................................err a bit like our existing Railways really.
 
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