Head Injuries - Long Term Stuff

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Just watching 'Nitro Circus' on Netflix, and it's lots of stunts, lots of bikes/trikes/motorbikes and stuff.

Helmet or body armour, but getting repeated whacks like that can't be good.

It's a reason lots of high level sports people have taken their own lives with the repeated knocks (helmet or not - I don't think that makes much difference).

I'm just seeing folk bent double and getting up - didn't work for me...

The STUNTS are amazing though, but for the 1 that is great, over 10 fail... thats a lot of hits.
 
OP
fossyant

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
OK, just seen them jumping a swimming pool on a enduro motorbike - failed badly..

PS - needs to go in CAFE
 

Slick

Veteran
Never seen nitro circus but I have seen a huge personality change after a fairly serious head injury.

It had nothing to do with cycling or stunts though.
 
OP
fossyant

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Never seen nitro circus but I have seen a huge personality change after a fairly serious head injury.

It had nothing to do with cycling or stunts though.
Certainly been a number of personality changes and suicides from professional sports people (rugby, boxing, american football, downhill MTB). Watching that programme though, it just seems folk will do anything to get famous on you tube etc without considering the risk of constantly impacting your head.

The jumping a swimming pool - bike fell short, and it was only by luck did the rider not smash head first into the concrete edge.

Bonkers.
 

Beebo

Firm and Fruity
Location
Hexleybeef
Programmes like Jackass we’re doing that before internet viral clips went big, and I’m sure other people were doing it before then.

Young people do silly things just to get famous. It has always been true.

How many Ex boxers have slurred lisps when they talk. Getting hit in the head isn’t a good way to make money.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
Yes, what the public doesn't see is all the retired sports people who are living with life-changing injuries.
I have just watched a boxed set of 3 Discovery Channel documentaries featuring James Cracknell. In the middle of the second documentary he was cycling when his head was hit by a mirror on an overtaking truck.

He ended up suffering with epilepsy, forgetfulness and severe mood swings. It looks like his wife and kids can't take it any more because the couple have just separated.

The injury wasn't caused by repeated lesser blows to the head, but by one big one. Still, it shows what kind of damage can be caused.
 

tom73

Veteran
Location
Yorkshire
Mrs 73 been looking into head injures and long term effects and links to Dementia as part of her MSc. Sport and none sport injures. It’s a growing area of concern and research with stuff coming out all the time. The FA now accepts that heading the ball over many years is an issues in older footballers. Following a case of one who the coroner ruled heading the ball as a factor leading to his Dementia.
 

PaulB

Legendary Member
Location
Colne
My head injury (January 30th 2010) was very serious - for others, not for me, I was out of it and in a coma for nine days - but the after effects are quite minimal.

I have some memory loss where pop music lyrics are concerned and this really bothers me on occasion because I know I should know them like the back of my hand BUT I can still recount a randomly shuffled deck of cards, go through the list of presidents of the US or Prime Ministers/kings and Queens of Britain forwards or backwards. I lost no physical attributes and my firm and my doctor kept telling me to give it another month, another month, another month but I was keen to get back and test things out again so constantly badgering them to let me return to work. My wife reckoned I shed tears when I saw my body in a mirror in the hospital while I was taking a bath because I'd lost all the muscle in my legs and around my backside but that came back within three months. My belly unfortunately also returned after initially leaving me with an abdomen as flat as Southport beach!

The three people who reckon I've changed slightly (less agitated, more patient) are my father, my eldest son and my wife.

I think I may have been close to death at the time but the consultant says that may always be a closed door to me and my brain protects itself by keeping potentially damaging information from being revealed.

Overall, I get the feeling it's most similar to that Hammond feller out of Top Gear or James Cracknell's bonk on the bounce type thing.
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Funny isn't it that folk feel the need to perform all these stupid stunts in the hope of becoming famous. The generation who landed in France on D-Day took far greater risks but don't seem to want to publicise their actions.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
My head injury (January 30th 2010) was very serious - for others, not for me, I was out of it and in a coma for nine days - but the after effects are quite minimal.

I have some memory loss where pop music lyrics are concerned and this really bothers me on occasion because I know I should know them like the back of my hand BUT I can still recount a randomly shuffled deck of cards, go through the list of presidents of the US or Prime Ministers/kings and Queens of Britain forwards or backwards. I lost no physical attributes and my firm and my doctor kept telling me to give it another month, another month, another month but I was keen to get back and test things out again so constantly badgering them to let me return to work. My wife reckoned I shed tears when I saw my body in a mirror in the hospital while I was taking a bath because I'd lost all the muscle in my legs and around my backside but that came back within three months. My belly unfortunately also returned after initially leaving me with an abdomen as flat as Southport beach!

The three people who reckon I've changed slightly (less agitated, more patient) are my father, my eldest son and my wife.

I think I may have been close to death at the time but the consultant says that may always be a closed door to me and my brain protects itself by keeping potentially damaging information from being revealed.

Overall, I get the feeling it's most similar to that Hammond feller out of Top Gear or James Cracknell's bonk on the bounce type thing.
Paul, I don't know if you have ever looked back at the posts that you made in the first year or so after your injury? I noticed at the time that you would sometimes use the wrong words or repeat yourself. It took some time before that stopped.

I am fairly sure that I suffered brain damage about 15 years ago when I nearly died from carbon monoxide poisoning. (I was rendered unconscious for a couple of hours but eventually came round and managed to crawl to safety.) A week later my sister told me that I sounded drunk when talking to her (sober!), and I was forgetting words and repeating myself. Even now, I find myself sometimes accidentally substituting words in a way that isn't normal e.g. I might try to type 'The cat sat on the mat' only for it to end up on the computer screen as something weird like 'The bat was on the hat'! I also have difficulty in recognising people unless I know them really well. I struggle to remember the intricacies of TV show plots. I'm just getting to the end of Boardwalk Empire and I forget who is/was in which gang, who got bumped off, who did it and why! I have asked who a character is, having watched 3 or 4 complete series with them in ... :wacko: Hopefully, it is 'just' damage from the CO gas and not the beginnings of dementia!

Oh, and wandering off topic without realising it ... What I meant to add was that I wouldn't deliberately do things that risked brain damage. I saw a few minutes of a boxing match the other night but couldn't stand watching a boxer's head getting pummelled!
 

PaulB

Legendary Member
Location
Colne
Paul, I don't know if you have ever looked back at the posts that you made in the first year or so after your injury? I noticed at the time that you would sometimes use the wrong words or repeat yourself. It took some time before that stopped.

I am fairly sure that I suffered brain damage about 15 years ago when I nearly died from carbon monoxide poisoning. (I was rendered unconscious for a couple of hours but eventually came round and managed to crawl to safety.) A week later my sister told me that I sounded drunk when talking to her (sober!), and I was forgetting words and repeating myself. Even now, I find myself sometimes accidentally substituting words in a way that isn't normal e.g. I might try to type 'The cat sat on the mat' only for it to end up on the computer screen as something weird like 'The bat was on the hat'! I also have difficulty in recognising people unless I know them really well. I struggle to remember the intricacies of TV show plots. I'm just getting to the end of Boardwalk Empire and I forget who is/was in which gang, who got bumped off, who did it and why! I have asked who a character is, having watched 3 or 4 complete series with them in ... :wacko: Hopefully, it is 'just' damage from the CO gas and not the beginnings of dementia!

Oh, and wandering off topic without realising it ... What I meant to add was that I wouldn't deliberately do things that risked brain damage. I saw a few minutes of a boxing match the other night but couldn't stand watching a boxer's head getting pummelled!
Well remembered, Colin.

I looked back on an email I'd sent to my colleagues of the time and it was entirely inappropriate and very poorly written. The grammar and sense of style improved month by month but I'd say out took a full three years before I'd made a complete recovery.

My company were very, very good, particularly after one colleague had come all the way to Preston from London and assumed I'd be sitting up in bed chatting away while I had a bandage round my head or something. He admitted being very shocked and worried at the state he found me in with tubes and lines doing everything for me and wondered if I'd even survive and if I did, would I have some permanent disability or major memory loss.

And maybe age does have something to do with it because the three years I estimate it took me to return to 'normality' also made me three years older and I'm hoping this isn't the beginnings of dementia and if so, maybe this wouldn't have happened if I hadn't cracked my head open in the first place!
 
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