Giant FastRoad Advanced 1 Carbon?

Maherees

Well-Known Member
Location
Northampton
Hi all,
i have first been flirting with a titanium flat bar but they seem quite expensive but now come across the Giant FastRoad Advanced 1 Carbon which seems to have the speed of a road bike but less punishing on the back and neck. Not seen any reviews as yet so thought I'd canvass a few opinions from the more experienced of you out there.
thahks
 
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Maherees

Maherees

Well-Known Member
Location
Northampton
Hi all,
in my quest to get a fast road bike but with a flat bar set up i have added 2 more to the list ming the total list:
Trek FX sport 6
Giant FastRoad Adv 1
Specialized Sirrus 6.0

just want to replicate the speed of a road bike without the stoop.
thanks
 

vickster

Legendary Member
And the Whyte Sterling :okay:

You can also get an upright position on a roadbike with the right frame and set up :okay:
 
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Maherees

Maherees

Well-Known Member
Location
Northampton
maybe that might be the case but i can ride for several hours on my MTB with no pain but the road bike causes me some pain. I see a fast flatbar as maybe the best blend.
 
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Maherees

Maherees

Well-Known Member
Location
Northampton
Yes already have Sram Rival 1
 

Will Rowling

Well-Known Member
@ Maherees ... did you finally decide ?
I have to say that I get confused when people talk about a bike with flat bars being better for the back.
On a road bike, most people never hold the drops as they hold the hoods. My Fuji flat bar road bike keeps me at the same angle as holding the hoods. This is what I want. For this, the frame has to be longer than a bike with curly bars. Examples of flat bar road bikes are Whyte Sterling etc (they even list them under "road bikes"), Giant Fastroad, Canyon Roadlite. The ideal titanium would be a Snowdon Paradox for a mere £4k ...

Most bikes (non-MTB) with flat bars are actually 'road bike frames with flat bars' rather than 'flat bar road bikes' ... so the frame is too short resulting in having to sit fairly upright. These I call shopping bikes, including some rather expensive shopping bikes, such as Specialized Sirrus, BMC etc. If the frame is too short, sitting too upright, then on a steep hill you could do a wheelie ... which might not do your back any good at all. Of course, if you really want to sit upright, then that's fine, but it's not easy for people to identify what's what.

Some firms these days categorise flat bar road bikes as "fitness" bikes ... but not in the UK as that's something in the gym. In any case, you still need to check the geometry. You might get away with putting flat bars on a road bike frame bigger than you'd use for a curly bar bike, but the wheelbase is usually too short, your feet might hit the front wheel, you might do wheelies and you might do yourself a mischief if the standover height is excessive.

In short, there's not a lot of choice in flat bar road bikes and identifying them isn't easy.
 
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Maherees

Maherees

Well-Known Member
Location
Northampton
No, i did not get the flat bar bike as yet due to the need to control spending as we moved in into uncertain times.
Not sure I agree with you as regards comfort as my MTB is marketably more comfortable to ride and easier on the back than my road bike is not. Maybe also the bars are so much wider.
On this mornings ride, most of the 'older' riders all had flat bar bikes.
Oddly enough I have changed the saddle and tinkered with the seating position and the back pain is now so much less. But I am not sure if this would be the case for a 100km + ride.
 
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