Getting cold feet about tomorrow's audax

OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
The other thing I should mention is that with experience you catch problems much earlier and tackle them before they bring you to a halt. If there’s something not quite right try and deal with it sooner rather than later.
I still need to learn bike maintenance and repair, I still don't know what to do about bike punctures , and Im always paranoid about that happening when Im in the middle of nowhere.......I have 2 left hands when it comes to stuff like that, Im embarrassed to admit.
 

Soltydog

Legendary Member
Location
near Hornsea
Wowwwww, that is kind of insane! Well done! Haha, I had no get out of jail card. How did you do such a long ride?! How long did it take? You must be in really good shape, like one of those people down in Richmond Park with very strong muscular legs! Let me know if you ever do that 200 mile ride!
Cheers, I spent nearly 11.5 hours in the saddle, but with an hour or two break at my parents house, so technically 2 rides of around 90+ miles in 1 day :laugh: I guess my legs are fairly strong, but over the years I've learned what my body needs/can manage on with regards to food & drink. I'd been back into cycling a few years before completing my first century ride so you're well ahead of me :okay: you might get a 200 mile ride in before me, Mine will be sometime next year hopefully.
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
Cheers, I spent nearly 11.5 hours in the saddle, but with an hour or two break at my parents house, so technically 2 rides of around 90+ miles in 1 day :laugh: I guess my legs are fairly strong, but over the years I've learned what my body needs/can manage on with regards to food & drink. I'd been back into cycling a few years before completing my first century ride so you're well ahead of me :okay: you might get a 200 mile ride in before me, Mine will be sometime next year hopefully.
Haha :laugh: How are you training for the 200 miles? I have no idea how to train other than just riding my bike, but I probably need some other strategy! That is absolutely crazy, I don't know how your parents did not make you stay overnight!:laugh: Haha I bet you raided your Mum' fridge the minute you got there! I don't what goals to set myself next,any idea-except for 200 miles:laugh:. 11.5 hours is quite quick, considering you had to maintain a pace.
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
Cheers, I spent nearly 11.5 hours in the saddle, but with an hour or two break at my parents house, so technically 2 rides of around 90+ miles in 1 day :laugh: I guess my legs are fairly strong, but over the years I've learned what my body needs/can manage on with regards to food & drink. I'd been back into cycling a few years before completing my first century ride so you're well ahead of me :okay: you might get a 200 mile ride in before me, Mine will be sometime next year hopefully.
How is your average speed so high?
 
My longest ride was
Reasons for DNF

Being complacent about fitness and preparation having completed what I thought were harder audaxes the year before. Never underestimate your current challenge no matter your past history. Always prepare, you are only as good as your current preparations and fitness.

Physical deterioration (not an accident ) that made it impossible to continue riding safely after so many hours in the saddle.

Heat Exhaustion / dehydration. I’m not great in the heat and didn’t do enough to combat and keep on top of it.

Stomach issues meaning I couldn’t eat any more and grinding to a halt with lack of energy, with a long remote section ahead. Balancing safety against the desire to finish. Needed a good sleep, then gradual reintroduction of food to recover.

You examine the reasons these things occurred then try and make changes to avoid. Sometimes changes take a while to find the solution. But you try again if you like audax. Not finishing, now and again, just becomes part of your audax experiences. At long as the ratio of finishes to not finishing is right for you, and you enjoy the rides, you keep returning.


You just described me at the start of the 2016 Wild Atlantic Way ^_^ I finished day one (360km) and I knew I was screwed and nearly packed then but figured I would just try and get as far as I could , I ran out of time on the last day with 114km to go :sad:
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
My longest ride was




You just described me at the start of the 2016 Wild Atlantic Way ^_^ I finished day one (360km) and I knew I was screwed and nearly packed then but figured I would just try and get as far as I could , I ran out of time on the last day with 114km to go :sad:
Well done! That's absolutely crazy you managed to go so far!
 

icowden

Über Member
Location
Surrey
I still need to learn bike maintenance and repair, I still don't know what to do about bike punctures , and Im always paranoid about that happening when Im in the middle of nowhere.......I have 2 left hands when it comes to stuff like that, Im embarrassed to admit.
When you get that nice top tube bag, get a spare inner tube, some tyre levers and a pump (hand pump). Practice taking your wheels on and off so you are comfortable with doing that. If you have conventional brakes (rather than disc brakes) also do some googling to find out how to release them so you can get the wheel off.

If the tyre is flat it's usually easy to get the tyre off, release the valve and remove the inner tube. It's getting it back on that's the hard bit. You want to seat your innertube - get the valve in the little hole nicely and put the holding nut on but not too tight. Then put a little bit of air in the inner tube, but only a little bit. Then you want to use those tyre levers to get the tyre over the inner tube. That's the hardest bit. Once you have the tyre on, get the wheel back on the bike and start pumping (or use one of those groovy gas inflators if you feel massively confident!.

There are loads of people on here who will give you much better guidance than I just have :-)
 

Ming the Merciless

Formerly YukonBoy
Location
Inside my skull
I love cake. But a bit put off sweets after yesterday, felt like my teeth were erroding by the end, with energy gels, gummies, citrus flavoured sports mix dissolved in my water, oreos, flapjack, pbj sandwich... I don't know how you did it on so little food!!!!!
I did say on your other thread to have some savoury even though for the distance you were doing, you can get away with sugary stuff.

Now for some science. You ask how some can ride so far and not need to eat very much. You’ve essentially got two energy stores, your fat reserves, and your glycogen stores. You’ve also got ATP for sprinting.

Glycogen is stored in the muscles and in the liver. Glycogen stored in your arm muscles can’t be used by your leg muscles. But glycogen in the liver can. Muscles use their local glycogen store first, followed by the liver. You have about 2000-3000 calories of glycogen stored if you are rested.

Fat is stored round the body as we all know. We have about 100,000 calories of fat reserves. Even the skinniest person will be close to this figure.

When cycling you’ll be burning between 400-600 calories an hour. So worst case glycogen will be used up in 3 hours, or may last around 7 hours. Fortunately we have those fat reserves and even at 600 calories an hour thats 166 hours it’ll last almost 7 days. For sprinting our bodies make ATP but that is for only short sharp bursts such as getting up a steep bit of hill quickly.

But we don’t exclusively use glycogen for fuel or fat for fuel we burn a mixture. The mix depends on our fitness and the intensity we are working at.

Fitness is a wooly term so what am I referring to? You can train and improve the amount of fat the body uses (for energy) at all intensities. You’ve head of the long low intensity rides, those slow rides that feel effortless and aren’t doing anything. They are not just about getting time in the saddle. It actually gets the body to adapt and produce more of the enzymes needed to utilise fat as an energy source, your capillary network in the muscle also gets denser for delivering oxygen and remove waste products from the muscle . Research says the rides need to be at least two hours and increase the duration as you get used to it. Then there is high intensity which forces the heart to adapt and get stronger, and for more muscle fibres to get recruited or added. Combine the two, in the right proportions , and your endurance fitness will come along in leaps and bounds. You’ll be burning more fat at higher intensities, meaning you don’t need to eat half as much, and you won’t be exhausting your glycogen on a long audax. Your heart is able to deliver more oxygen rich blood at lower bpm, and your muscles are more easily able to utilise the oxygen, your fibres are stronger , the muscles aren’t working as hard for a particular intensity, you have more fibres and can store more glycogen. Your legs are more fatigue resistant.

Back to sugary snacks. When sugar spikes in the blood, and we have more sugar than we immediately need, then insulin gets released. The insulin helps convert the excess sugar to be stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles. But another affect of that insulin is that it suppresses your body from burning fat for energy. In effect your body sees the excess sugar and thinks it means it can burn the glycogen instead. You are tapping into that energy source that will only last a few hours and not the one that can last a number of days. Once the sugar is dealt with and insulin levels drop, your body will start to utilise your fat reserves as a percentage again.

If you think about it. Our ancestors might do some high energy hunting for a few hours, burning glycogen. Then sit around for long periods burning fat. It’s only recently we’ve had easy access and frequent access to foods high in sugar.Our bodies haven’t really adapted since the days we were hunter gathers. So what happening kind of make sense from an evolutionary point of view.

Foods have a glycemic index which indicates how quickly the sugars are released into the blood. If it releases quickly into the blood you get that spike and insulin quickly rises to combat it. It’s why it’s suggested you eat low glycemic foods like porridge, slow release. You don’t get the big spike, nor massive release of insulin , so fat burning can continue as no big excess of sugar in blood stream.

Sugary snacks are great to dig you out a hole and say get you to the next shop 20 mins away. But they should not be regularly snacked on, on a long ride, as it’ll just cause your energy levels to alternately peak and then slump, and eventually bonk as the glycogen is burnt more and runs out.

Some of this based on experience, and some based on the science I’ve read.
 
Last edited:

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
I rode 50km to Fulbeck- I was 40 minutes late to the event :sad: I did half the event 57km and realised there is no way I'm finishing on time because I had to stop every now and then (I was on 107km bu then), so I cycled to Oakham and thought I'll get a train home but then they weren't running on sunday- so I cycled back to Notts- did 173km that day and did not complete the audax. Now I feel to embarrassed to ever try do another audax, I slept 5-6 hours and my body was giving up on me in that audax. Now Im too embarrassed to even be on this forum :sad: I don't think I'm a great cyclist.

Well done on the distance you did. It's a great achievement. So don't give up on Audax. It's all a learning curve for you.

On a side note did you let the organiser know you had scratched? If not, can you please do so in future. If for any reason you scratch again. Otherwise they would have been waiting for you to finish, that, and also it's the polite thing to do.
 

cougie uk

Senior Member
What's your longest ever distance in a day?

I don't know because I was late about 40 minutes to the event :shy: so didn't see them...

I can't fit anything else on my handle bars anymore- I have lights,bell,quadlock and bike computer... Top tube bikes-I'll look into that, thank you :smile:

My sister is a road bike cyclist- but she's in a different city than me for uni :sad: We cycled together during the summer though when we were both at home, a highly recommended way to get away from your parents.. I'm meant to join the uni cycling club but not sure how things will work with covid. Wanted to join OVB (cycling club in Notts) but wouldn't make the cut, Im too new for them most likely.

I love cake. But a bit put off sweets after yesterday, felt like my teeth were erroding by the end, with energy gels, gummies, citrus flavoured sports mix dissolved in my water, oreos, flapjack, pbj sandwich... I don't know how you did it on so little food!!!!!

What should I do next, since Im not doing another audax anytime soon? How do I progress from here? What goals should I set myself?

How come you were so late ? Misjudged the pace ?

I'd set myself little goals - go visit a castle or something 40 miles away or something. Research a decent cycling cafe and ride there.

You do need to be able to fix punctures. Look it up on YouTube and practice on your front wheel first.

Get that sorted and then you can practice on the rear wheel.

Of your bike is looked after and cleaned I reckon 95% of incidents are punctures.
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
When you get that nice top tube bag, get a spare inner tube, some tyre levers and a pump (hand pump). Practice taking your wheels on and off so you are comfortable with doing that. If you have conventional brakes (rather than disc brakes) also do some googling to find out how to release them so you can get the wheel off.

If the tyre is flat it's usually easy to get the tyre off, release the valve and remove the inner tube. It's getting it back on that's the hard bit. You want to seat your innertube - get the valve in the little hole nicely and put the holding nut on but not too tight. Then put a little bit of air in the inner tube, but only a little bit. Then you want to use those tyre levers to get the tyre over the inner tube. That's the hardest bit. Once you have the tyre on, get the wheel back on the bike and start pumping (or use one of those groovy gas inflators if you feel massively confident!.

There are loads of people on here who will give you much better guidance than I just have :-)
I have leevers, mini pump and an inner tube. I took the wheel off and took things apart, I just couldn't fit the tyre back on around the inner tube well and it was rubbing..I tried re-adjusting it but couldn't get that right. :sad:
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
I did say on your other thread to have some savoury even though for the distance you were doing, you can get away with sugary stuff.

Now for some science. You ask how some can ride so far and not need to eat very much. You’ve essentially got two energy stores, your fat reserves, and your glycogen stores. You’ve also got ATP for sprinting.

Glycogen is stored in the muscles and in the liver. Glycogen stored in your arm muscles can’t be used by your leg muscles. But glycogen in the liver can. Muscles use their local glycogen store first, followed by the liver. You have about 2000-3000 calories of glycogen stored if you are rested.

Fat is stored round the body as we all know. We have about 100,000 calories of fat reserves. Even the skinniest person will be close to this figure.

When cycling you’ll be burning between 400-600 calories an hour. So worst case glycogen will be used up in 3 hours, or may last around 7 hours. Fortunately we have those fat reserves and even at 600 calories an hour thats 166 hours it’ll last almost 7 days. For sprinting our bodies make ATP but that is for only short sharp bursts such as getting up a steep bit of hill quickly.

But we don’t exclusively use glycogen for fuel or fat for fuel we burn a mixture. The mix depends on our fitness and the intensity we are working at.

Fitness is a wooly term so what am I referring to? You can train and improve the amount of fat the body uses (for energy) at all intensities. You’ve head of the long low intensity rides, those slow rides that feel effortless and aren’t doing anything. They are not just about getting time in the saddle. It actually gets the body to adapt and produce more of the enzymes needed to utilise fat as an energy source, your capillary network in the muscle also gets denser for delivering oxygen and remove waste products from the muscle . Research says the rides need to be at least two hours and increase the duration as you get used to it. Then there is high intensity which forces the heart to adapt and get stronger, and for more muscle fibres to get recruited or added. Combine the two, in the right proportions , and your endurance fitness will come along in leaps and bounds. You’ll be burning more fat at higher intensities, meaning you don’t need to eat half as much, and you won’t be exhausting your glycogen on a long audax. Your heart is able to deliver more oxygen rich blood at lower bpm, and your muscles are more easily able to utilise the oxygen, your fibres are stronger , the muscles aren’t working as hard for a particular intensity, you have more fibres and can store more glycogen. Your legs are more fatigue resistant.

Back to sugary snacks. When sugar spikes in the blood, and we have more sugar than we immediately need, then insulin gets released. The insulin helps convert the excess sugar to be stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles. But another affect of that insulin is that it suppresses your body from burning fat for energy. In effect your body sees the excess sugar and thinks it means it can burn the glycogen instead. You are tapping into that energy source that will only last a few hours and not the one that can last a number of days. Once the sugar is dealt with and insulin levels drop, your body will start to utilise your fat reserves as a percentage again.

If you think about it. Our ancestors might do some high energy hunting for a few hours, burning glycogen. Then sit around for long periods burning fat. It’s only recently we’ve had easy access and frequent access to foods high in sugar.Our bodies haven’t really adapted since the days we were hunter gathers. So what happening kind of make sense from an evolutionary point of view.

Foods have a glycemic index which indicates how quickly the sugars are released into the blood. If it releases quickly into the blood you get that spike and insulin quickly rises to combat it. It’s why it’s suggested you eat low glycemic foods like porridge, slow release. You don’t get the big spike, nor massive release of insulin , so fat burning can continue as no big excess of sugar in blood stream.

Sugary snacks are great to dig you out a hole and say get you to the next shop 20 mins away. But they should not be regularly snacked on, on a long ride, as it’ll just cause your energy levels to alternately peak and then slump, and eventually bonk as the glycogen is burnt more and runs out.

Some of this based on experience, and some based on the science I’ve read.
Thanks for explaining, made lots of sense since I'm a science student :biggrin: So is the only thing I can do for now is just to spend more time in the saddle and wait for my body to adapt? I just can't help but snack quite frequently because I get tired.. I should eat more low glycemic index foods, think I ate majority high glycemic foods on that ride😅
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
Well done on the distance you did. It's a great achievement. So don't give up on Audax. It's all a learning curve for you.

On a side note did you let the organiser know you had scratched? If not, can you please do so in future. If for any reason you scratch again. Otherwise they would have been waiting for you to finish, that, and also it's the polite thing to do.
I did let them know.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
I have leevers, mini pump and an inner tube. I took the wheel off and took things apart, I just couldn't fit the tyre back on around the inner tube well and it was rubbing..I tried re-adjusting it but couldn't get that right. :sad:
When at first you don't succeed - give up



Then watch all the help videos you can find on Google or ask a friend.


Then try, try again
 
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