Chat Zone for The Big Big Trip Journal!

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
Regarding those trousers, which model did you use Hobbes?
I'm after a pair as I plan on touring without the lycra and wondered about a good alternative.
Oh dear! I'm afraid I can't tell you - they were quite old & Decathlon don't do them anymore - my one irritation with Decathlon - they are always replacing their range. I did check my local Decathlon before I left and the material they are using now is different and not, in my opinion, suitable for on the bike.

The zip off trousers I got in REI in Austin have still not been used - I'm back in shorts^_^ - also Decathlon, also no longer in stock. They're my favourite to tour in unless it's very cold. Cargo style hiking shorts. Rip resistant, quick drying and easy to wipe off. The multiple pockets come in very handy.

Sorry I can't be more help
 

Vantage

The dogs chew toy
No probs Hobbes. I went there today to look at walking trousers. They had loads of different ones but all had one thing in common......all sized for lanky giants. Nothing for the vertically challenged amongst us.
 
Location
London
Question re your coffee habit hobbes. From a coffee head. You often describe, with appreciation,managing to find your first coffee of the day. Don t you carry stuff with you to fix your habit?
 

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
Question re your coffee habit hobbes. From a coffee head. You often describe, with appreciation,managing to find your first coffee of the day. Don t you carry stuff with you to fix your habit?
Of course! Never without it. However, there is no comparison in the ease & speed of rolling up to a store and getting a cup of coffee as opposed to brewing one & the unpacking/packing that entails.
 

IaninSheffield

Über Member
Location
Sheffield, UK
Find it heart-warming that you're mostly welcomed and feted in a country where you're a stranger, perhaps even more so than you might be in your own country?
Examples similar to the kindnesses you seem to have enjoyed since arriving in Mexico are, at least in my experience, sadly much rarer for the cycle tourer here in the UK.
 

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
It's nice to see that Mexico hasn't been quite the tourist kidnapping extravaganza that you feared.
By all accounts, it sounds like a very nice place indeed! Happy trails amigo!
That makes two of us @Vantage :laugh:

The advice for the two states I've been in is to "reconsider your need to travel".

Every day I'll pass the paramilitary Police checkpoints. They hardly register with me now. For example, yesterday arriving in Durango I was waved around the back of one to avoid the traffic.

Also, I haven't really hit any of the tourist areas either. That may also be a factor.

But yes, it is a very nice place! It may not be for everyone but I'm certainly enjoying it!^_^
 

CharlesF

Guru
Location
Glasgow
From your latest post, I can empathise with the height of the Dutch; I spend a fair bit of time Leiden and am dwarfed by most of the Dutch.

Also, I reckon Mexico can appoint you as unofficial Tourism Minister, you have made Mexico an unmissable destination with the pictures and friendliness of the people.
 

HobbesOnTour

Über Member
Location
The Netherlands
Find it heart-warming that you're mostly welcomed and feted in a country where you're a stranger, perhaps even more so than you might be in your own country?
Examples similar to the kindnesses you seem to have enjoyed since arriving in Mexico are, at least in my experience, sadly much rarer for the cycle tourer here in the UK.
I'd tend to agree, not just with my limited experience in the UK & Ireland, but also on Mainland Europe with the possible exception of Spain. Unsolicited help or assistance is rare, yet I'm pretty sure that if I needed help it would be forthcoming.

I can't help but think that a lot of the difference is down to culture. I've had many positive encounters with people in Europe, but normally there has been a "reason" for them to break the ice - perhaps eating beside the loaded bike, or stopped looking at a map.
Here, people turn around and come after me (in the best sense!). There is no formality to it, no apparent reason. It is very refreshing!

Then there's the level of expression. In the UK or Ireland I might get a finger or two raised from a steering wheel in recognition, that was a standard greeting in a lot of rural USA. Here it's a full arm wave - or more!

What I can offer no thoughts on are the trucks! Not all, certainly, but the vast majority, are beyond respectful and make me feel like a welcome part of the road community. In the States I was invisible!

Of course, in this part of Mexico a loaded bike tourist is a rarity so that's a factor too.

Sometimes on some of my weekend trips in NL I'd play the clueless foreign tourist (not a demanding role for me^_^) and ask a question of someone. Then the hospitality & friendliness would be on display. A bit duplicitous on my part, but enjoyable.
 
Top Bottom