Carbon fibre trike. Beutiful

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Frankly I find it hard to accept that it is worth 4 times the price of a Trice or Kettwiesel. Their write up is short on details and long on hype. For instance, how much does it weigh? Also 32 and 53 gear options? A 32 I can see as a Schlupfed 16 (but that gives an 8 speed cassette, not a high end option these days), 53 needs some explination.
 
It's a damned sight less elegant looking than a Speedy or a Catrike (that stupid looking bend in the boom?) and it has the same steering set-up as a KMX. For £8K? i don't think we'll be seeing very many on the roads..
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
mickle said:
It's a damned sight less elegant looking than a Speedy or a Catrike (that stupid looking bend in the boom?) and it has the same steering set-up as a KMX. For £8K? i don't think we'll be seeing very many on the roads..
The write up suggests the maker has not done a lot of competitor research. Neither does it inspire confidence in his attention to detail. I say again, how does he get a 53 speed gear train???????????????
 
OP
Redmountduo

Redmountduo

Über Member
Our redmounts have 53.
Scram dual drive hub+ 9 speed cassette with double chainrings.
The dualdrive hub has 3 internal gears.
Dont know if he is using a simalar set up?
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Redmountduo said:
Our redmounts have 53.
Scram dual drive hub+ 9 speed cassette with double chainrings.
The dualdrive hub has 3 internal gears.
Dont know if he is using a simalar set up?
3x9=27 DD total
double chainrings
2x27=54

I ran a front triple on a 9 speed DD on my Azub giving 81 but 53 is a prime number so is impossible to get short of a 53 ring rear sprocket!
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
I wonder if he's quoting the different gears it has rather than the total. Just a thought, All in all I wouldn't buy one of his trikes given the glitches and omissions in his write up.
 

banjokat

New Member
Location
York, UK
I don't think it's aimed at cyclists, more well heeled gadget seekers. AFAIC it's a waste of good carbon.
 

Mike at INNESENTI

New Member
Thanks for the feed back. As a new member, I'd like to address the questions posted in this thread.

We have been updating the website and all the specs should be listed for each model. Gearing is handled via a 10 speed Marchisio cassette 12-30 and a special high speed 32 tooth Schlumpf crank to give a total of 20 speeds. You are correct that you will see very few of these. The cost to build the frame alone exceeds the cost of most complete recumbents regardless of the configuration. This is not a mass produced product nor is it intended to be such. The frame uses the latest carbon fibre and takes over 60 hours to make. There is no question it is expensive and we clearly state the price on the web site. Many of the components are custom made just for the INNESNETI which also adds to the cost but creates a very durable machine. The bend in the front serves a specific purpose as this is where we add length to fit a larger rider. You might be axle to see the "extension" just in front of the front axle.

For those of you who would like more information, please feel free to email me directly at mike@innesenti.com
 

StuAff

Silencing his legs regularly
Location
Portsmouth
Mike, welcome, nice to see you on here answering the questions. As an upwrong rider who nonetheless has a hankering after a trike at some point in the future, I have to say the Innesenti strikes me as impressively engineered, desirable, but compromised (the idea of non-compromise design is sadly oxymoronic). Lack of luggage facilities on the sport model (how about a streamlined box as certain other manufacturers offer?), no front mudguards, I think there are better gearing options out there (how about the SRAM or Shimano 10 speed MTB systems- bigger range with fewer custom parts?)..You mention rear lights on the web site, what about fronts? And so on....
And it doesn't fold in any way shape or form. I know that it's designed to be stiff yet comfortable, hinges etc would limit that, but people might want to go on trains or carry them in cars occasionally....
 

Mike at INNESENTI

New Member
All valid questions. It was not intended to be used in conjunction with luggage as that was not the intended use. This is why we have a touring version and a trailer. We know this is not the best solution long term and we are working on alternatives. We have tried some streamlining with limited success but this just ruins the look. THe gearing range is plenty wide enough now with the current system. The SRAM components simply fell apart so those were thrown out. We do have a Rolhoff Speedhub 500/14 version now and that has proven to be a great solution. For the most part, the drive train is standard equipment so we do save some money there. We offer both front and rear lights if you want them. The top of the bottom bracket is drilled and tapped for mounting what ever you want for a head light and the rear lights mount on the seat bushings.

Folding is hot right now but it's not in the design plans as of yet. Our first change to support easier transport was to engineer special front forks so the wheel will drop out without taking the disk brake rotor off. You can image the extra weight if we included a folding system. Mighe be something we look at in later releases. Oh, and the front mud guards you were asking about. You have one option today where standard fenders will work just fine, however we are in the design phases for a radical design that I think will really get people talking. Still a few months away but should be very cool once it's completed.

We are very much intrested in peoples requirements and desires. A key point that fails to makes it's way into print is how we really focused on reducing rolling resistance. Weight is important but this rides and handles like trikes weighing several kgs less. There is very little wasted energy in the design which also helps ensure it stays together. One of the test models was struck by a car and is still in use today. Some of the components (wheels) didn't fair as well but the frame never missed a beat.

If you are in the London area, give Trevor a call. I'm sure you would love to go out on a ride with you sometime.
 

PalmerSperry

Well-Known Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
mickle said:
It's a damned sight less elegant looking than a Speedy or a Catrike (that stupid looking bend in the boom?) and it has the same steering set-up as a KMX. For £8K? i don't think we'll be seeing very many on the roads..
Yeah ... The back end looks quite good, but that bent boom???
 

SmileyBoots

Über Member
Location
Derby
At the bottom of their home page they state that it is "the most practical man powered sports machine in the world."

Does that mean there is a more practical woman powered version?
 
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