Bread bins, what's occurring?

Chris S

Guru
Location
Birmingham
Out of interest I googled storing bread in the fridge, and most research reckons it actually goes stale quicker in the fridge.
Yes - but it goes mouldy quicker out of the fridge.
 

glasgowcyclist

Charming but somewhat feckless
Location
Scotland
So, what does that mean? It’s not killed me in 47 years
Bread goes mouldy on the counter top and I don’t like it after it’s been frozen so it also ends up in the bin. Fridge works for the one loaf I buy a month if that. Fresh Rolls eaten the same day are my preference
Are you perhaps conflating staleness with mould?

Staleness is when the formerly gel-like chains of starch return to their crystalline form and give you that dried out, tough texture. It's still okay to eat just not pleasant, although in that state it is perfect for other recipes such as panzanella.

There's an article that explains it all here: https://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/articles/apr19_stale_bread/
 

glasgowcyclist

Charming but somewhat feckless
Location
Scotland
Since giving up bread for a long time, I can no longer eat it - without getting stomach pains
Does that go for homemade bread as well as the industrially manufactured stuff?

Yes - but it goes mouldy quicker out of the fridge.
I wrap my loaves individually in a 50p cotton tea towel from Ikea the store in a metal bread bin. (Much cheaper than a drawstring cotton bread bag at £8 or more.)

teatowel.jpg

My bread keeps well for four or five days for sandwiches like this, and thereafter it's used for toast as it has started to dry out too much.
I can get 7 days from a loaf this way with no mould.
 
OP
meta lon

meta lon

Guru
I dont refrigerate or freeze bread.
We decided to not put the lid on the bread bin, seems to have solved the chem smell
 

vickster

Legendary Member
What’s the benefit of having a bread bin then?
 
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