Bikes designed for Californian weather, not British.

Globalti

Legendary Member
I've just been looking at a Specialized Diverge online and in the close-up shots I notice that there's quite a gap between the fork top and the head tube. Past experience tells me that water flung off the front wheel will go straight in there, penetrate and sit around the bearing, which will be a mass of rust within a few days. It's standard for me, on buying a bike, to drop out the fork and cover the bottom headset bearing with grease or lanoline in an effort to save it from British wet. When they do rust you can sometimes revive them with new ball bearings and a good clean-up as replacements are ridicuously expensive and hard to find.

Anybody else share my frustration with this bad design? It really is a supreme example of the arrogance of out-of-touch engineers.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
This is obviously a case for 1970s style shorty mudguards!


Or just mudguards in general. But I think it's a good rallying point to call for the return of shorties, although I fear this may go the same way as my ill fated "bring back wheelnuts" campaign.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Anybody else share my frustration with this bad design? It really is a supreme example of the arrogance of out-of-touch engineers.
You've got to remember that bikes are not always designed for longevity and particularly these types. Typically used for 2/3 years then another style becomes popular so it's traded and then it's another poor buggers problem.
 
OP
Globalti

Globalti

Legendary Member
I guess so yes, although my 2014 Roubaix is going strong as my wet weather bike with its headset bearing properly protected. In fact I took it out for a quickie last night in between showers and remembered what a comfortable and smooth-riding all-rounder it is.
 
OP
Globalti

Globalti

Legendary Member
Care to explain how the Roubaix's headset is protected? Or is this just with your "grease/lanoline"?
A good smear of grease or lanoline, yes. Lanoline is a good waterproofer but it stiffens up in cold weather and eventually dries up and becomes sticky so you can't use it inside headset bearings.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
To be honest, it doesn't make any difference if the gap is big or small, water will still get in there just the same. It is the seal within that matters and the modern trend is for cartridge bearings that have a built in seal, so the first line of defence is also the last. I would argue that the larger gap is actually better as it allows the water to escape and dry out easier, rather than sitting in a semi-enclosed space festering.
 
OP
Globalti

Globalti

Legendary Member
Very true but in really wet conditions or after washing the bike, water can easily get inside the head tube from above, where it just re-condenses and festers.
 
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