Bicycle Security V.2

Good call on the Coach Bolts, used them on my shed for years & fingers crossed, no issues so far, but a determined thief will just rip the panels off.

What I have wondered is, is there any sort of tracker as used on cars that could be put inside frames etc & if not why not ?

Impractical maybe, easily found & removed ?

I dunno, answers on a postcard.
They do exist.
 

chrisuren

Well-Known Member
Great thread, loads of info in the comments.

Personally I recommend the Kryptonite Evo Series 4 D Lock and some pedal padlocks all in about £55 and I think that is a good amount to spend on security.
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
Just about to start adding an inner skin of plywood to my bike store, i know its not much of an extra security but it should make it a lille harder to get into if the get through the side wall and find another layer , then theirs the ground anchors into the concrete drive under the store .
 
Pretty unimpressed with the Links attempt to beef up shed security tbh. Why would you use normal bolts on the hinges when you would use Coach Bolts with no head on the outside instead? Also pretty pointless spray painting the windows when you can just spec your shed without windows. If you need a window buy a second hand UPVC one, dirt cheap off gumtree etc. Beef up the door frame with some 2x4/2x6, and the actual door too. Then you can add a couple of Mortice locks and a couple of Hinge Bolts for extra security too.
Pragmasis have some good products for sheds.

Their "beef up kit" (coach bolts and drill bit)

http://securityforbikes.com/beef-up-kit.php

Shed shackle, multiple securing points to prevent/delay the wall anchor being crowbarred off the wall.

http://securityforbikes.com/shed-shackle.php

General advice.

http://securityforbikes.com/wooden-shed-security-advice.php
 

RufusChucklebutty

Senior Member
Theives use battery grinders now, no D lock or chain is secure anymore. I just had a generator stolen that way.

Where do we go from here ?

Personally I'm a welder, and I will be fabricating something so outrageously big out of girders that it will take a demolition firm to remove it.
 
A word from sad experience. It's bloody obvious after the event, but if you're securing your bike up in the garage or shed, make sure you also secure any tools that could be used to remove your lock, such as your angle grinder etc.

Probably illegal, but I looked around my garage for areas that prying fingers may want to test, and lined them with carpet grippers so there was a chance of some DNA evidence. I've changed it now, but I also left a tempting gap with a somewhat more robust arrangement, but unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) there were no takers.
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
Theives use battery grinders now, no D lock or chain is secure anymore. I just had a generator stolen that way.

Where do we go from here ?

Personally I'm a welder, and I will be fabricating something so outrageously big out of girders that it will take a demolition firm to remove it.
You can buy metal cages that you put up inside a shed, of course you could build one yourself if your a welder
 
Location
North West
I often think if I caught someone in garage, I would send Fido in and close the roller door before quietly walking away........oops officer, it was an unfortunate accident.
 
New here so go easy on me!

Firstly, cracking thread and brilliant opening post. Many thanks!

I know that the first priority is to put thieves off, but where do you stand on the bike chips you can get? I know you can pick them up for a reasonable price but are they any good? I was thinking of getting them for my bikes (not that they're worth much).
 

Mr. Cow

Well-Known Member
Location
Manchester
Haven't read the whole thread, but if you keep your bike in your garage then it might be worth installing further locking points on your garage door. Some manufacturers offer kits (eg, "garador") which simply bolt on and expand the locking points from 2 to 4. Also get your garage door fitted with a contact and wired to your intruder alarm if you have one. Set your alarm to monitor the external doors/downstairs when you go to bed at night.

Worth noting that most bike insurance companies consider your garage as "external" if there is no integral personnel door. In which case your bike would need to be locked to an immovable object such as a ground anchor for the insurance to be valid if a claim was ever made.
 

bigjim

Guru
Location
Manchester. UK
IMO it's worth spending time stopping them getting into the garage in the first place. I've had a few attempted break-ins but the internal alarms have triggered and they have legged it but the doors and locks have been damaged. I have therefore had to spent time and money replacing them. I now put my wheelie bins up against the door especially the noisy bottle ones. They are also alarmed. I also back the car up to the door. I sometimes lock the driveway gates as well. Anything as a deterrent. Next week I'm installing sensor lights. I've just bought and fitted this.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/301681212599?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT
Quite impressed with the quality. Really heavy duty and a good price.
 
Top Bottom