Bicycle lights

Heltor Chasca

Out-riding the Black Dog
I have some really nice Moon lights.

I had Lezyne but with time the USB connections on all 4 of them have become faulty and when you charge them you have to tape them or use elastic bands. Impossible to recharge on the moving bike with a battery or dynohub.
 

icowden

Über Member
Location
Surrey
I swear by my Cateye Volt 400s (USB rechargeable).
I do also swear at them however when one of them has gone flat and I'm about to set off home.

If you go rechargeable it's worth have a second cheap standard battery driven light as an emergency backup!
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
+1
I'm using the earlier cateye volt 300 and was amazed by it's brightness.

Brackets are good and are the same for most , if not all cateye lights.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
I can recommend the Moon Meteor X Pro and they're frequently on offer.

I'd agree with using two rear lights - and in terms of sheer VFM, it's hard to fault Poundlands 5-LED rear lights.
That's the one I have (indeed I even have an unopened spare bought during one of those many deals). The only issue is it's easy to switch on accidentally when in bag and it can get rather hot!
I didn't like Lezyne terribly, seemed to conk out quickly, and not cheap
 
OP
Chris S

Chris S

Guru
Location
Sparkhill
You don't need a new light, just fix the problem with your existing light. If it is a battery light, it means that the batteries aren't tightly packed. Put a bit of foam rubber in to secure them. If it is a dynamo light, you have a loose contact somewhere.
The lights come back on again when I press the switch again so I think the problem is here.
 
Location
Loch side.
The lights come back on again when I press the switch again so I think the problem is here.

Loose contact. Disassemble switch and clean out.
 
Location
London
@Chris S I still don't think you have told us what the lights are for?

For night time riding in the country or just "to be seen" lights in town/built up areas.

May then be able to give some relevant advice.

The good news is that you don't need to pay a lot for perfectly decent lights these days.

That will stay on over bumps.

Nor do they have to be "dogs bollocks", "bad boys", "bitches", "laser eye burners" or whatever. Or incredibly incredibly incredibly small.**

If you ride in London (haven't checked) please don't be one of the nits blinding me for no good reason at all.

I'd second advice above to always use two rear lights - and mount them sensibly - and ensure that aren't or can become obscured.

** though for folks who demand such performance from their city lights I can assure them that I am still working on my prototype suppository that will make their arse flash like a giant distress beacon. It will be sold on a monthly rental basis with a course of dietary supplements which will ensure that their rear flesh continues to shine and pulse to the max, whatever the ambient temperature. By internalising the light they will of course add not a microgram to the bike's weight.
 
OP
Chris S

Chris S

Guru
Location
Sparkhill
Loose contact. Disassemble switch and clean out.
The switch is just a springy metal strip that makes contact with a printed circuit. The first time it turns the light on, the next few times it goes through various flashing modes and then turns the light off.
I can't stop the metal strip springing when I go over a bump so I'll just have to get some decent lights.
 
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